Sunbathing Case Study

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SUNBATHING CASE STUDY
Luke Wren

12/7/2011
Luke wren

SUNBATHING CASE STUDY

• Introduction
I have chosen sunbathing as I think it is important that people my age know about the long term and short term risks and problems sunbathing can cause, I am interested in this as I think the long term risk is not worth the short term tan and I would like to warn others about the highly dangerous risks that just aren’t worth taking. Although sunbathing can enhance your looks and self confidence, it can be very harmful when not used properly, used too often or used without UV protection creams.

• Scientific Information
Ultraviolet or UV rays have a shorter wave length than visible light yet is longer than X-rays. UV rays are not visible to humans yet are visible to some insects. UV rays get their name from electromagnetic waves which frequencies are higher than those that humans can identify as the colour violet. Although ultraviolet radiation is invisible to the human eye, a lot of people are aware of the effects of UV rays in tanning beds and the sun through sunburn and skin cancer.

-Wikipedia
The electromagnetic spectrum, this picture demonstrates the approximate wave length, colours of the rays, the scale of wave length and whether they can penetrate the earth’s atmosphere.

Arguments for and against Sunbathing
Against:
Teenagers who use sun beds are at a much higher risk of getting cancer than those who don’t. This is because of the high exposure to UV rays. So how does cancer form? Sunbathing causes cancer through ionising radiation found in UV rays, gamma rays and x rays, these three rays are high in energy and when the photons from these rays hit the atom, this breaks the atom into smaller parts called ions this then damages the cells through ionisation, the cell then loses all power to control cell division and growth, this causes the cell to grow rapidly this then forms a cancerous tumor. Brittany Lietz, a...
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