Sun Bathing- Arguements Against

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1. It can cause skin cancer which can kill you or at least leave you with serious damage to your skin.

Evidence
Too much exposure to the sun is dangerous. A cancer research UK survey found a worrying gap between how much people know about skin cancer and how little they actually do to protect themselves in the sun. Among 16-24 year olds 73% believed that exposure to the sun might cause skin cancer but only a quarter of this age group apply high factor sunscreen protection and fewer than 20% cover up or seek shade from the sun. (Source; GCSE science- higher). Scientists have found that people with lighter skin are more likely to get skin cancer although the main cause of skin cancer is caused by over exposure to the suns harmful UV rays. Research says that a sun tan is not healthy and is in fact a sign of skin damage. (Source; http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/in_depth/cancer/skincancer1.shtml) The Cancer Research UK figures from 2005-the latest available- show that 338 women aged between 20 and 29 were diagnosed the melanoma, compared with the 298 women that were diagnosed with cervical cancer. (Source; www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/5925847/sunbeds-ranked-alongside-cigrettes-as-cancer-risk) Around 2,000 people a year die from melanoma and Cancer Research UK predicts rates will triple in the next 30 years unless there’s a radical change in sunbathing habits. Britain has more deaths from skin cancer than Australia. (Source; www.nhs.uk/livewell/travelhealth/pages/bingesunbathing.aspx)

2. It can make your skin look old and wrinkly.

Evidence
Without protection from the sun’s rays, just a few minutes in the sun each day over the years can cause skin to noticeably change in appearance. Freckles, age spots, spider lines over the face, rough and leathery skin, fine wrinkles that disappear when stretched, loose skin, a blotchy complexion and actinic keratoses (thick wart like, rough, reddish patches of skin) can all be traced back...
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