Substance Abuse

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RESEARCH CASE STUDY: PERSONAL INTERVIEWED - ALCOHOL ABUSE
Jennifer Campbell
Theories of Personality (PSY 500A)
Lynn University
December 6, 2012

Introduction
The purpose of this paper is to create a case study based on a specific theory of personality development. Kelly (1969) stated that personality theory presents a positive view of human nature (Schultz, & Schultz, 2009). The combination of cognitive and behavioral, together forms the infrastructure of the individual's personality; in addition, sometimes used as a mechanism to recognized a person's distinctive way of managing challenges and determine whether the outcomes will negatively or positively impact the individual (Schultz, & Schultz, 2009).

Given the consensus in the field, based on Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) Albert Ellis describes the term CBT as the psychotherapeutic approach implemented to treat persons who are affected with mental conditions, such as, depression, anxiety, and addiction (Fox, 2006). Moreover, this theory is the modality of choice which addresses maladaptive behaviors, dysfunctional emotions, and cognitive processes (Fox, 2006). This approach appears to be the most suitable for the theory of this case study. As cited in Fox, (2006), "CBT was primarily developed through an integration of behavior therapy with cognitive psychology research, first by Donald Meichenbaum and several other authors with the label of cognitive-behavior modification in the late 1970s (p.68)".

CBT is often highly recommended and implemented when identified treatment goals are acknowledged and outcomes are easily measured; this theory was later combined with previous work of other researchers, such as, Aaron Beck who developed Cognitive Therapy (CT), along with Albert Ellis who created Rational Emotional Therapy (RET) (Glass, C. R. 1993). Understanding of human thoughts and behaviors has emerged through various psychological theories (Glass, C. R. (1993). Interpreting behaviors and events, cognitive theories focused on several attributes, mainly internal states, motivation, problem solving, decision-making, thinking, and attention (Dingle, Gleadhill, & Baker, 2008). By being more knowledgeable about these theories one can achieve a deeper and richer understanding of psychology's past, present and future (Dingle, Gleadhill, & Baker, 2008).

Based on research cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorders has been shown to be effective in multiple trials, using statistical techniques to demonstrate mediation (Kiluk, 2011). Individuals may be taught to understand the relationship between behaviors, and feelings in order to develop cognitive coping strategies such as positive affirmation (Fox, 2006). Personal Interviewed: Case study

In my personal interview with Josh Knocklebury conducted on November 26, 2012, topics surrounding his addiction to alcoholism were investigated.
Josh was referred to the psychologist by his family who expressed concern about his frequent consumption of alcohol. This case study will adhere to clients confidentiality, therefore, the name and personal information have been altered. Josh is a forty-three years old Caucasian male who stated that he grew up in a middle class family in northern New Jersey. He provided personal and family history including graduating from a four-year college in 1988. with a Bachelors degree in finance. He later served four years in the British Air Force as a Captain. In 1992 Josh was honorably discharged from active duty. In 1996, he married Nancy, his college sweetheart and four years later their first child was born, and the second child two years after.

Josh worked for the same Financial firm for fourteen years and was laid off last spring due to economic recession. Despite searching for a job for the past nine months, he has still been unable to find employment. Prior to being unemployed, he had little time for hobbies or...
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