Street Foods

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DFID/NRI/FRI PROJECT
R No 7493 (ZB0199)

Project Title:
ENHANCING THE FOOD SECURITY OF THE PERI-URBAN AND URBAN POOR THROUGH IMPROVEMENTS TO THE QUALITY, SAFETY AND ECONOMICS OF STREET-VENDED FOODS

REPORT ON WORKSHOP FOR STAKEHOLDERS, POLICY MAKERS AND REGULATORS OF STREET-FOOD VENDING IN ACCRA , HELD AT MIKLIN HOTEL, 25- 26, SEPT. 2000

Edited by

P-N. T. Johnson and R. M. Yawson
Food Research Institute (CSIR)
Box M. 20, Accra

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction2

The DFID/NRI/FRI Improved street-vended foods project4

2. The Workshop5
2.1Opening Ceremony5
2.2Welcome address by the Deputy Director-General, CSIR-INSS6 2.3Keynote address by the Minister, MEST8

3. Plenary Section11
3.1 Introduction of DFID/NRI/FRI Street-vended foods project – objectives, activities and overview (Dr. P. N. T. Johnson (CSIR-FRI))11

4Scientific Sections12
4.1Socio-economic survey of street-vended foods in Accra, P. Obeng-Asiedu, Dept of Agric. Economics., University of Ghana12 CONCLUSIONS13
4.2Street-vended foods and Hygiene - Dr. R. Myhara, NRI16 4.3 A HACCP approach to the prevention of mycotoxins through moisture control. Dr. P. N. T. Johnson, CSIR-FRI19 4.5Heavy metals, pesticides and mycotoxins in street-vended foods20 K. Tomlins, NRI20

4.6Improvements to street food vending in Accra, J. Laryea, Metro Public Health Dept., Accra Metropolitan Assembly23 4.7Health-related problems with street foods in Accra. Overview of recent cases Dr. A. Arde-Acquah, Metro Public Health Director28 4.8Organochlorine pesticide residues and heavy metals contamination in some farming area in the Ashanti Region Dr. Osafo Acquaah, KNUST33 4.9Improvements to street food vending in Ghana – A historical perspective A. Ntiforo, Chief Scientific Officer, Ghana Standard Board34 4.10Problems faced by street food vendors in Accra, G. Apraku, GTCA40 4.11 Street-vended foods in Accra: A worker’s concerns and expectations. D. Asiedu, FRI42 4.12AMA bye – laws and policies on street-food vending in Accra S. Fenteng, Accra Metro Solicitor, Accra Metropolitan Assembly46 4.13GES position on food sold to school Children in Accra. M. Adum-Atta, GES Metro Education52

Discussion57

OPEN FORUM57
APPENDIX 1 --ACRONYMS61
APPENDIX 2 --LIST OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS62

Introduction

There has been a continuing growth in urbanisation in developing countries, and governments’ face a major challenge in ensuring that city dwellers are able to procure sufficient food. Street foods are sold in almost every country in the world. The FAO (1989) defines street food as any ready-to-consume food that is sold in public places. Tinker (1997) also defines street food as any minimally processed food sold on the street for immediate consumption. In most towns and cities in Ghana, selling of snacks and whole meals on the streets is an important way to obtain income, especially among the poor women. Street foods have a long tradition in most countries. The role of this sector in the urbanisation process and the urban economy reflects the way of life and the survival and coping strategies adopted in most African cities (Gnammon-Adiko 1996). Rapid urbanisation is breaking down traditional family ties throughout the world and the street food sector is widely understood as an inevitable phenomenon tied to urban growth. This urbanisation and the associated social and structural changes have caused the demand for street food to increase. Longer traveling times between living and working places is likely to lead to further increases in demand. Accra with a current population of about 3 million is the capital of Ghana and is hampered by an inadequate transportation system linking the sub-urban areas with the commercial and...
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