Strategic Audit

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MBA Program 38

Strategic Management

Mid Term Audit

Prepared By: Mohamed Mohamed Kotb

Submitted To: Dr/ Ashraf Sheta

Contents

Introduction…………………………………………………………………3

Strategic Posture ……………………………………………………………4

1. Organizational Profile………………………………………………………...........4 2. Vision…………………………………………………………………………………………5 3. Mission………………………………………………………………………………………5 4. Organizational objectives ……………………………………………………..…..5 5. Corporate governance………………………………………………………………6 6. CSR…………………………………………………………………..........................12 7. Core values……………………………………………………………………………..13 8. Code of conduct……………………………………………………………………..15 9. Policies/standard operating procedure………………….……………….19

External Factor Analysis…………………………………………………..21

10. Stakeholders analysis……………………………………………………….……...21 11. PESTEL analysis………………………………………………………………………..22 12. Task environment…………………………………………………………………….24 13. Issues priority matrix………………………………………………………………..27 14. Porter five competitive forces analysis……………………………………..27 15. Strategic group…………………………………………………………………………29 16. Strategic type…………………………………………………………………………..29 17. Industry matrix…………………………………………………………………………30 18. EFAS…………………………………………………………………………………………31

• Introduction:

The telecommunications business is undergoing a critical revolution, driven by innovative technologies, globalization, and deregulation. Cellular networks and telecommunications bring radical changes to the way telecom businesses are conducted. Globalization, on the other hand, is tearing down legacy barriers and forcing monopolistic national carriers to compete internationally. Moreover, the noticeable progress of many countries towards deregulation coupled with liberalization is significantly increasing telecom market power and allowing severe competition.

The ability to communicate from anywhere at any time presents extraordinary levels of flexibility and expediency, and the stage is now clear for wireless networks and telecommunications to bring tremendous changes to the way businesses are conducted and the way in which we live our lives. Because of the newness of this area as well as the provisioning of new technologies such as third and fourth generation cellular phone services, this has become one of the most important and exciting areas for research purposes.

Think of telecommunications as the world's biggest machine. Strung together by complex networks, telephones, mobile phones and internet-linked PCs, the global system touches nearly all of us. It allows us to speak, share thoughts and do business with nearly anyone, regardless of where in the world they might be. Telecom operating companies make all this happen.

Not long ago, the telecommunications industry was comprised of a club of big national and regional operators. Over the past decade, the industry has been swept up in rapid deregulation and innovation. In many countries around the world, government monopolies are now privatized and they face a plethora of new competitors. Traditional markets have been turned upside down, as the growth in mobile services out paces the fixed line and the internet starts to replace voice as the staple business.

Plain old telephone calls continue to be the industry's biggest revenue generator, but thanks to advances in network technology, this is changing. Telecom is less about voice and increasingly about text and images. High-speed internet access, which delivers computer-based data applications such as broadband information services and interactive entertainment, is rapidly making its way into homes and businesses around the world. The main broadband telecom technology - Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) - ushers in the new era. The fastest growth comes from services...
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