South African Healthcare

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  • Topic: Malaria, Antimalarial drug, Mosquito
  • Pages : 9 (2584 words )
  • Download(s) : 40
  • Published : October 18, 2010
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Before visiting South Africa, you may need to get the following vaccinations and medications for vaccine-preventable diseases and other diseases you might be at risk for at your destination: (Note: Your doctor or health-care provider will determine what you will need, depending on factors such as your health and immunization history, areas of the country you will be visiting, and planned activities.) To have the most benefit, see a health-care provider at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for your vaccines to take effect and to start taking medicine to prevent malaria, if you need it. Even if you have less than 4 weeks before you leave, you should still see a health-care provider for needed vaccines, anti-malaria drugs and other medications and information about how to protect yourself from illness and injury while traveling. CDC recommends that you see a health-care provider who specializes in Travel Medicine.  Find a travel medicine clinic near you. If you have a medical condition, you should also share your travel plans with any doctors you are currently seeing for other medical reasons. If your travel plans will take you to more than one country during a single trip, be sure to let your health-care provider know so that you can receive the appropriate vaccinations and information for all of your destinations. Long-term travelers, such as those who plan to work or study abroad, may also need additional vaccinations as required by their employer or school. Although yellow fever is not a disease risk in South Africa, the government requires travelers arriving from countries where yellow fever is present to present proof of yellow fever vaccination. If you will be traveling to one of these countries where yellow fever is present before arriving in South Africa, this requirement must be taken into consideration. Be sure your routine vaccinations are up-to-date. Check the links below to see which vaccinations adults and children should get. Routine vaccines, as they are often called, such as for influenza, chickenpox (or varicella), polio, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), and diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) are given at all stages of life; see the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule and routine adult immunization schedule. Routine vaccines are recommended even if you do not travel. Although childhood diseases, such as measles, rarely occur in the United States, they are still common in many parts of the world. A traveler who is not vaccinated would be at risk for infection.

Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Vaccine recommendations are based on the best available risk information. Please note that the level of risk for vaccine-preventable diseases can change at any time. |Vaccination or Disease |Recommendations or Requirements for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | |Routine  |Recommended if you are not up-to-date with routine shots such as, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, | | |diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, etc. | |Hepatitis A or immune |Recommended for all unvaccinated people traveling to or working in countries with an intermediate or | |globulin (IG) |high level of hepatitis A virus infection (see map) where exposure might occur through food or water. | | |Cases of travel-related hepatitis A can also occur in travelers to developing countries with "standard" | | |tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors. | |Hepatitis B  |Recommended for all unvaccinated persons traveling to or working in countries with intermediate to high | | |levels of endemic HBV transmission (see map), especially those who might be exposed to blood or body | | |fluids, have sexual contact with the local...
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