Hepatitis B

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 15
  • Published : February 3, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Hepatitis B Vaccine
It takes only 3 shots to protect yourself and your loved ones against hepatitis B for a lifetime. In 1981, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first vaccine for hepatitis B, which was plasma-derived (i.e. made from blood products). This vaccine was discontinued in 1990 and is no longer available in the U.S.  The currently used hepatitis B vaccines are made synthetically (i.e. they do not contain blood products) and have been available in the U.S. since 1986. You cannot get hepatitis B from the vaccine. This safe and effective vaccine is recommended for all infants at birth and for children up to 18 years. Adults, especially those who fall into a high-risk group, should also seriously consider getting the hepatitis B vaccine. Vaccine Side Effects and Safety

Common side effects include soreness, swelling and redness at the injection site. The vaccine may not be recommended for those with documented yeast allergies or a history of an adverse reaction to the vaccine. The Hepatitis B vaccine is considered one of the safest and most effective vaccines ever made. Numerous studies looking at the vaccine's safety have been conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization, and other professional medical associations. They have not found any evidence that the vaccine causes sudden infant deaths (SIDs), multiple sclerosis, or other neurological disorders. Vaccine Recommendations

The hepatitis B vaccine is recommended specifically for all infants and children by the Centers for Disease Control and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The CDC also recommends that adults in high-risk groups be vaccinated. The following list is a general guide for vaccination, but since every person is at some risk for infection, these guidelines should be individualized for each situation. * All infants at birth and all children up to 18 years.

* Health care professionals and emergency personnel.
* Sexually active teens...
tracking img