Sonnet 130

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In the sonnet 130, by William Shakespeare, plays an elaborate joke on the convention of love poetry. He describes his beloved in a surprising way, informing that she is not the possessor of good looks. In the end poet concludes that he loves his beloved more than he could a perfect maiden. Overall, appearance does not matter where true love is concerned. We normally expect poets to praise their woman they love by comparing them with natures most beautiful things. However, in this poem the speaker is frank and honest. “I have seen roses damasked red and white, but no such roses see I in her cheeks”. In line 6: The speaker takes the standard image of rosy cheeks a step further here, pretending to be surprised that there aren't actually red and white roses in this woman's cheeks. In this poem the poet is not making exaggerating comparisons. “Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;”. The poet is not making exaggerating comparisons but honestly describing his beloved in a simple way. In line 2: Comparing lips to red coral gives us another over-the-top simile. Lips that red would have to be painted, and that's the kind of fake beauty that this poet is against.

The ordinary beauty and humanity of his lover are what is important to Shakespeare in this sonnet, and he deliberately uses typical love poetry metaphors against themselves. “If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head”. Hair is another major cliché about women’s beauty. The poet is saying that if her hair is black then its like wires that grows on her hair. Shakespeare uses image of hair as black wires. This is significant because the poet is trying to make a point that his mistress is not perfect. In this poem, the speaker insist that love does not need conceits in order to be real; and women do not need to look like flowers or the sun in order to be beautiful. “And in some perfumes is there more delight...
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