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"The Solitary Reaper" by William Wordsworth. Poem analysis.

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"The Solitary Reaper" by William Wordsworth. Poem analysis.

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  • April 1, 1997
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Its an analzis of a poem by William Wordsworth -

Jennifer Lasky

Ms. Grant

English 10 per 6

April 7, 1997

The Solitary Reaper

By William Wordsworth (1770-1850).

"The Solitary Reaper", is a poem divided in four different stanzas, and each stanza has eight lines. Throughout the course of the poem Wordsworth's voice evolves from being an outsider voice into an insider voice; simultaneous, to the evolution of the voice, Wordsworth uses different ways and means to present the spokesman by itself as an emerging voice, which responds to each changing situation. And the poem will flow from an outside perspective into the inside perspective.

From the beginning of the poem, Wordsworth establishes a relationship with us, his audience and readers, which is as important as the relationship he has with the lady. In other words Wordsworth is to the Scottish lass, as we are to him.

In the first two stanzas Wordsworth is going to emerge as an outsider voice. In the first stanza, the author let us know about the Scottish lass, who is working on the field at the same time that she is singing with sadness. But the notes produced by her chant are flowing all over the profound valley. The way it is written gives the feeling that the lass' voice is going to be heard any minute and enjoy it in the same manner as Wordsworth is starting to re-create the beauty and the strength of her voice.

Also, in this first stanza we - his audience - receive three open commands from Wordsworth, which integrates us into the poem, and maintain our attention into it. The author's command are open because as readers we can not respond directly to him, we just continue reading the poem, which might be Wordworth's objective.

In the second stanza, as an outsider voice, Wordsworth fully re-creates the beauties of the chant. And Wordsworth reaches his goal using the comparison as the means of transportation, comparing the maiden's song with a Nightingale and the newness of the...