Solid Waste Management

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 185
  • Published : February 7, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
UNIVERSITY OF CALOOCAN CITY
Bachelor in Public Administration
Tulip St., Area C, Camarin, Caloocan City

Implementation of Waste Management Program in Three (3) Selected Barangays in District 1, Caloocan City

A Thesis Proposal
Presented to
The Faculty of Public Administration
UNIVERSITY OF CALOOCAN CITY

In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Bachelor in Public Administration

By:

Bato, Misha
Flores, Mary Adelita
Gueta, Janzen Mark
Labordo, Renelyn
Ratilla, Jeminah
Sta. Romana, Hannabet
Tradio, Emarie

BPA 4-B

2013

Chapter 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction
In any nation or country, waste management is always part of their equation to maintain their balance, not just environmentally but economically.
The Philippines is a country of 85 million people and encompasses 7,107 islands, though only about 2,000 islands are currently inhabited. The Philippines has a total area of 30 million hectares, which is roughly 90% the total area of the nearby country, Malaysia. The Archipelago stretches more than 1,800 kilometers (km) north to south and 1,100 km east to west, and is located between the South China Sea and the Philippine Sea.

With a rapidly growing population and lack of adequate disposal sites, solid waste has become a major problem for most medium to large-size cities. When Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo took office in January, 2001, the first act she signed into law dealt with solid waste management. In recent years, inadequate solid waste management systems have posed serious health risks particularly in densely populated areas. In Manila, for example, the closure of the largest disposal site in 200 combined with the inadequate capacity at the other sites resulted in the disposal of tons of waste along city streets, empty lots, and in the waterways and bays in and around the city. Scavenging for recyclable material at open dumps is very common throughout many parts of the Philippines. Tragically, excessive open dumping of solid waste combined with the seasonal monsoon rains at the Payatas sire in July 2000 caused a large-scale slope failure that resulted in the deaths of hundreds of scavengers.

Waste management practices can differ for developed and developing nations. It is the collection, transport, processing or disposal managing and monitoring of waste materials. The term waste management usually relates to materials produced by human activity, and the process is generally undertaken to reduce their effect on health, the environment or aesthetics. Waste management is also a distinct practice from resource recovery which focuses on delaying the rate of consumption of natural resources. All waste materials, whether they are solid, liquid, gaseous or radioactive fall within the remit of waste management.

Background of the study
In the United States of America (USA), where over 311 million people live, almost all methods of waste management are being used. A program call Municipal Solid Waste does this. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) - more commonly known as trash or garbage - consists of everyday items we use and then throw away, such as product packaging, grass clippings, furniture, clothing, bottles, food scraps, newspapers, appliances, paint, and batteries. This comes from our homes, schools, hospitals, and businesses.

Each year produces a report on MSW generation, recycling and disposal. In 2010, Americans generated about 250 million tons of trash and recycled and composted over 85 million tons of this material, equivalent to a 34.1 percent recycling rate. On average, we recycled and composted 1.51 pounds of our individual waste generation of 4.43 pounds per person per day. They encourage practices that reduce the amount of waste needing to be disposed of, such as waste prevention, recycling and composting.

Europe, where almost 739, 165,030 people live, make different strategies in dealing with waste.
In the United...
tracking img