Slept Analysis of Denmark

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 141
  • Published : January 14, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
SLEPT ANALYSIS OF DENMARK

Denmark is a Scandinavian country in Northern Europe. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and bordered to the south by Germany. S - Socio Culture

L - Legal
E - Economic
P - Political
T – Technology
Socio Culture
Language - The national language is Danish.
Religion
(i) According to official statistics from January 2010, 80.9% of the population of Denmark are members of the Danish National Church (Den Danske Folkekirke), a Lutheran church that was made the official state religion by the Constitution of Denmark. (ii) Article 6 of the Constitution states that the Royal Family must belong to this Church, though the rest of the population is free to adhere to other faiths. (iii) About 15% of the Danes do not belong to any denomination. (iv) Muslims make less than 4% of the population yet are the second largest religious community. A Mosque in Copenhagen of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. First Mosque in Denmark.

(v) Denmark has the third highest proportion of atheists and agnostics in the world, estimated to be between 43% and 80% of its population. Aesthetics -
Values/attributes
Social organization

Culture
(i) Hans Christian Andersen is known beyond Denmark for his fairy tales, such as The Emperor's New Clothes, The Little Mermaid and The Ugly Duckling. (ii) Nobel laureate physicist Niels Bohr.

(iii) Denmark, like its Scandinavian neighbours, has been one of the most socially progressive cultures in the world. For example, in 1969, Denmark was the first country to legalise pornography. And in 1989, Denmark enacted a registered partnership law, becoming the first country in the world to grant same-sex couples nearly all of the rights and responsibilities of marriage. (iv) A locally popular film genre is the charmingly good-natured "folkekomedie" (folk comedy) which originated in 1930s (v) In the late 19th century, literature was seen as...
tracking img