Sensory Adaptation

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Sensory Adaptation

Abstract
This paper describes three home type experiments and their conclusions as related to sensory perceptions. This paper will also describe the meaning and concept of sensory adaptation, and how it is evident within the discussed experiments. A description of the sensory systems that are involved with the experiments, as well as what happens from the nerve receptors to the brain.

Sensory Adaptation
Sensory adaptation refers to how a person’s body adjusts to the effects of a certain stimulus, over a period of time. It is diminished sensitivity to the sensory receptors due to overstimulation. Some examples of this include temperature and darkness (Examples of Stimulation, n.d.). The concept of sensory adaptation is that all senses depend on the working nervous system. Our senses start to work when something stimulates our nerve cell receptors. These receptors send signals to the brain. These signals in turn Impulse frequency decreases during constant stimulation with time (Sensory Adaptation, 2001). Experiment 1- Sandpaper

After rubbing the index finger over very coarse sandpaper a few times, the rating for the sandpapers coarseness on a scale from one( being very soft) and seven (being very coarse), the rating is a 5 for the first perception. The second time of rubbing an index finger over the same sandpaper, the rating again is a five. My perception of the coarseness of the sandpaper is stayed the same. Only my fingers felt smoother and softer from rubbing on the sandpaper (AIU Online Multimedia Course Material, 2011). Experiment 2- Sugar Water vs. Plain Water

With this experiment, a small amount of sugar water is swished around the mouth for several seconds without swallowing it. Then a small amount of regular water is swished around in the mouth for several seconds without swallowing it. Upon completing this experiment, it was noticed that the sugar water tasted less sweet...
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