School Lunches; Government Surplus or Five Star Dining.

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Nutrition, Meal, School
  • Pages : 4 (1328 words )
  • Download(s) : 99
  • Published : April 27, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview

School Lunches; Government Surplus or Five Star Dining.

Abstract
Schools lunches have been in the news a lot over the last few years. Parents want their children to have health, tasty, and affordable food. With raising health concerns, fuel prices, food cost, and unemployment rates, it is getting harder to meet all the demands. Also, let us not forget the fussy eater and food allergies that are on the raise across the globe. Many different schools and countries are trying different approaches to try to meet the new apprehensions. This leads to questions and concerns on what is the precise ways for meeting the demands.

School Lunches: Government Surplus or Five Star Dining
While First Lady Michelle Obama and lawmakers have been patting themselves on the back for passing a child nutrition bill aimed at improving U.S. school lunches recently, other nations have been revamping their school food programs with more nutritious, sustainable food for the better part of the past decade. School Lunch in the Early Years

For millions of U.S. students, a hot meal has been part of the school day since Congress passed the National School Lunch Program in 1946. However, with many items on today's menus crammed with fat and calories, educators are taking a cue from the local-food movement to put school lunches on a healthier path. The National School Lunch Program, intended to prevent the return of Depression-era child malnourishment, allowed the government to buy surplus food from farmers and set minimum nutritional values for each meal. The last 30 years

The 1980s and '90s saw school districts contract with private companies to stock brand-name soft drinks and snacks in exchange for a cut of the profits. While the partnerships boosted school revenue, they also exacerbated soaring childhood-obesity rates. In an effort to promote healthier diets, some schools have joined a national farm-to-school program that provides locally grown food to school cafeterias. Yet...
tracking img