Safety Life Cycle Management in Process Industries

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Safety Lifecycle Management In The Process Industries
The development of a qualitative safety-related information analysis technique


Copyright © 2002 by B. Knegtering

CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Knegtering, Berend Safety lifecycle management in the process industries : the development of a qualitative safety-related information analysis technique / by Berend Knegtering. – Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2002. – Proefschrift. ISBN 90-386-1747-X NUGI 684 Keywords: Safety lifecycle management / Safety management systems / Lifecyle models / Safety instrumental systems / Process safety / Maturity index on reliability Printed by: University Press Facilities, Eindhoven


Safety Lifecycle Management In The Process Industries
The development of a qualitative safety-related information analysis technique


ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr. R.A. van Santen, voor een commissie aangewezen door het College voor Promoties in het openbaar te verdedigen op vrijdag 17 mei 2002 om 16.00 uur


Berend Knegtering

geboren te Eindhoven


Dit proefschrift is goedgekeurd door de promotoren: A.C. Brombacher en J.C. Wortmann Copromotor: J.L. Rouvroye



In spite of the application of a wide variety of safeguarding measures, many accidents in the process industries still happen today. Experiences gained from these past accidents have led to the development of an increasing number of technical solutions. One of the best known and widely accepted technical solutions concerns the use of Safetyinstrumented Systems (SIS). In order to control the design and implementation of these technical solutions, numerous safety-related standards have been written. These safety standards are comprised of technology-oriented requirements concerning ‘adequate’ implementation of the designed solutions. Consequently, compliance with these standards is often considered to be ‘good engineering practice’. Compliance with these technical standards, however, did not prevent several major accidents. As a result of the continuously growing complexity of both industrial processes and the related safetyinstrumented systems, it appears that new kinds of problems have arisen [Kne00b], [Kne01]. As this thesis will show, many of these specific problems are related to the control of safety-related business processes. Review of recent studies on incidents and accidents showed problems regarding the quality of information on potential accidents and the related technological solutions. Therefore, adequate control of the quality of safety-related information seems to be of essential importance if realization of an acceptable safety level is to be achieved. As an answer to solve these problems related to business processes, recent standards on SIS have defined safety lifecycle models. Safety lifecycle models are considered to form an adequate framework to identify, allocate, structure, and control safety-related requirements. Standards on SIS often specify lifecycle phases of these models in terms of objectives, required inputs, and required outputs. A description of the objectives, inputs and outputs characterizes these aspects. It appears, however, that characterization itself is not always good enough to adequately achieve the defined objectives. This resulted in the definition of the following research questions. The first question concerns the way in which lifecycle models can be used to improve safety-related business processes. It is subsequently questioned what exactly is included in each phase, and which other factors determine the quality of the objectives to be achieved in each phase. The third research question is how the lifecycle phases are mutually related, and how the quality of the completion of one phase influences the quality of the passing...
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