Roosevelt Passing Executive Order 9066

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Two months following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Executive Order 9066 on February 19th, 1942. Executive Order 906 set in motion for the expulsion of 110,000 Japanese Americans from the West Coast to inland prison camps. Although FDR, the President, had passed the Order, the expulsion had proceeded without due process of law as required by the U.S Constitution. Also, no camp inmate was accused of any crime, convicted, or charged of any act of “espionage or sabotage.” Even though some good may have been brought by the decision of signing the Order, I believe it mostly worked against our favor. After the Executive Order was signed, thousands of people were forced out of their homes and away from their lives and were made prisoners of war in their own country; two thirds of the people were American citizens. These citizens were presumed to be guilty just because of their ancestry. This was all done under the terms of “military necessity.” After all the chaos following the Executive Order, World Word II started. Camps were relocated to locations where families’ lives had to be interrupted, and even destroyed by the Order. Many people lost their homes, businesses’, and loved ones. While the war was in action, two cases had been heard by the Supreme Court that challenged the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066. Even though the cases were upheld on February 19th, 1976, Gerald Ford signed an order prohibiting the executive branch from reinstating the tragic WWII order. Then, in 1988 President Reagan issued a public apology on behalf of the government and the former Japanese internees and descendants. Overall, I think that Executive Order 9066 worked against us. Eventually, the Order had been apologized for and prohibited. The war following the Order hurt people more than helped.
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