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Role Ambiguity

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  • November 28, 2009
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Role Ambiguity and Role Conflict in an Organization
Jayson R Diaz
MBA-HRM

Workload, Stress and Performance
Too much stress is clearly undesirable, but too little stress can also lead to unexpected problem, For Example, too little stress may result in boredom and apathy and be accompanied by low performance, And although too much stress can cause anxiety and low performance, for most people there is an optimal level of stress that results in high energy, motivation and performance.

2 types of task demands
Physical Demands of a job are its physical requirements of the worker. For Example is temperature, working outdoors in a extreme temperature can result in stress, as can working in a improperly heated or cooled office; Strenuous labor such as loading heavy cargo or lifting packages can lead to similar results; office design also can be a problem. A poorly design office can make it difficult for people to have privacy or can promote too much stress or too little interaction.

Role Demands are stressors associated with the role a person is expected to play; also can be stressful for people in both formal and informal organization. Role is a set of expected behaviors associated with a particular person in a group or organization. Example; Social roles such as child, son or daughter, teenager, college student, boyfriend or girlfriend, spouse, parent and grand parent. Roles such as a Digital equipment operator, clerk, team leader, sales person, engineer, system analyst, department head, vice president and chairperson of the board.

Role Ambiguity and Role Conflict

Role Ambiguity arises when the scope and responsibilities of the job are unstructured or poorly defined
Example; the employee is not sure what is expected or even what to do. This is particularly crucial for new employees, whose job guidelines maybe unclear. Adequate orientation and socialization programs for new employees can reduce role ambiguity.

If your instructor tells you to...