Rock Cycle

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First off you should know what a rock cycle is. The rock cycle is a fundamental concept in geology that describes the dynamic transitions through geologic time among the three main rock types: sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous. Rocks make rocks. The cycle begins within the core of the earth. The molten rock in the core of the earth is called magma. Once the rock is forced to the earth's lithosphere or crust, the molten rock becomes lava and thereby begins its long journey of development into the different types of rocks. The basic categories of rocks include igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic.

The rock cycle is largely driven by lithospheric plate movements which cause oceanic crust creation and subduction with its associated melt and igneous rock formation, and uplift with it's associated metamorphism, along with exposure and erosion from climatic conditions due to the exposure. Plate tectonics (from the Late Latin tectonicus, from the Greek: "pertaining to building” is a scientific theory that describes the large-scale motions of Earth's lithosphere. The theory builds on the concepts of continental drift, developed during the first decades of the 20th century. It was accepted by the geo-scientific community after the concepts of seafloor spreading were developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Plate tectonics is basically a kinematic phenomenon: Earth scientists agree upon the observation and deduction that the plates have moved one with respect to the other, and debate and find agreements on how and when. But still a major question remains on what the motor behind this movement is; the geodynamic mechanism, and here science diverges in different theories.
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