Robert Frost, Stopping by Woods

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Whether people would like to admit it or not, everyone does things that do not always make sense. For instance, many people talk to inanimate objects when they do not work the way they are supposed to work. Even though people know that no decipherable response will come from them, pets and other animals are also often the recipients of other such one-sided conversations. In addition to simply talking to animals, many people give animals human characteristics such as emotions and thoughts, perhaps to help them feel less alone in the world. In “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” the speaker gives his horse thoughts and emotions, like any ordinary person would in his position, perhaps to show that he is feeling lonely and left out of the world. The poet of “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” Robert Frost, uses literary devices such as the personification of a horse to draw attention to common yet significant ideas.

One of the literary devices that Frost uses to get his impressions across to his reader is rhyme scheme; specifically, he employs end rhyme. The rhyme scheme in this poem is AABA

In the first three stanzas, this rhyme scheme draws attention to the third line. The reason Frost is trying to emphasize these lines is that each line contains a sensory detail about his surroundings. In line 3, the speaker comments that “[the owner of the woods] will not see me stopping here.” In line 7, the speaker describes his surroundings: “between the woods and frozen lake.” “The only other sound’s the sweep” describes what the speaker is hearing (l. 11). The use of these sensory details show that the speaker is very deep in nature and away from any other human life altogether. He mentions that he and his horse have stopped “without a farmhouse near” and that “the only other sound’s the sweep/Of easy wind and downy flake” to show how far from everywhere and everyone else he is. In the last stanza, however, the rhyme scheme...
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