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Chapter I


Dyeing has become part of daily living. For thousands of years, dyeing has been used by humans to decorate clothings and different kinds of fabrics. Its first used can be traced back 5000 years ago in India and Middle East where people used the most the most peculiar sources of the colors of their dyes. Since it’s first used , dyes have been dominating the industry. Before, dye manufacturers were only able to produce one color at a time. But now dyes come in every different colors and type as well. For its long years of usage, the primary source of dye has been nature obtained from animal, vegetable or mineral origin. But by far, the greatest source of dyes has been the plant kingdom, notably from their roots, bark, leaves, wood and their berries.

Malabar night shade ( basella rubra linn), commonly known as alugbati, is a fast-growing, soft-stemmed, branched, twining herbaceous vine with either purplish or green stem. It has fruits or berries that are stalkless, spherical, and purple when mature. Studies of the pigment extracted from its fruits showed that the intensely purple juice from the fruit contains anthocyanin which is natural food colorant.

Background of the Study

Dye is common in all of us. In last years, mankind has been able to produced artificial dyes that offer broader range of colors, and render more stable dyes to resist effects of washing and other general use. As the dyeing technology advances, it becomes more costly and expensive. In this case most families had very little to spare for new clothes that had been dyed costly. To brighten up their clothing, people nowadays can use dye that can be produced in simple ways or methods with the use of Alugbati plants found anywhere in our country.

Statement of the Problem

The investigation aims to explore the possibility of comingup with berries of the alugbati plant. Specifically, it aims to answer the following questions: 1.Do alugbati...
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