Reputation Management

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Reputation management is the practice of understanding or influencing an individual or business' reputation. It was originally coined as a public relations term, but advancement in computing, the internet and social media made it primarily an issue of search results. Although it is often associated with ethical grey areas, such as astroturfing review sites, trying to censor negative complaints or using gamey SEO tactics to influence results, there are also ethical forms of reputation management, such as responding to customer complaints, asking sites to take down incorrect information and using online feedback to influence product development.

History-
Public relations firm Weber Shandwick claims to have coined the term reputation management in 1997. The concept was initially intended to broaden public relations outside of media relations.[3] Today the rise of the internet and social media has shifted most reputation management to review sites, social media and—most prominently—the top search results on a brand or individual.[4][5] In 2007 a study by the University of California Berkeley found that some sellers were doing reputation management on eBay by selling products at a discount in exchange for positive feedback to game the system. Concepts-

Reputation management is the practice of monitoring the reputation of an individual or brand, addressing contents which are damaging to it, and using customer feedback to get feedback or early warning signals to reputation problems. Most of reputation management is focused on pushing down negative search results.[7] Reputation management may attempt to bridge the gap between how a company perceives itself and how others view it.[8] Online reputation management is the practice of monitoring the Internet reputation of a person, brand or business, with the goal of emphasizing positive coverage rather than negative reviews or feedback. Prior to a July 2007 story in the Washington Post the term online reputation...
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