Religion in New France

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  • Topic: New France, Louis XIII of France, Jacques Cartier
  • Pages : 1 (275 words )
  • Download(s) : 6324
  • Published : November 24, 2008
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Canada has a rich history that revolves around those who arrived first in the New World. French explorers were always attempting to develop a religious and profitable economy with the Aboriginals at some point in the midst of settling in their new surroundings. The founding of New France, the missionaries, and the original traditions and customs of the Natives were important influences on the success of converting the area to Catholicism. Religion was a very important aspect of French culture in these early stages of colonization. Throughout these stages, French Jesuits and Ursalines commissioned by King Louis XIII played a major role in developing religion in New France. The founding of New France had a major religious impact on the Aboriginals. The missionaries were partly successful in the conversion of Aboriginals to Catholicism. However, not all Natives were willing to convert, and this created problems with the French and other Native tribes. When the earliest French explorers arrived, they brought with them the idea they would convert all native to the land to Catholicism. On Jacques Cartier’s first voyage in 1534, he claimed the territory and raised a cross bearing the words “long live the king of France”. This forward and random approach at a new religion sent the Aboriginals into an upheaval. The French believed it was important for all to convert, so there would be no religious differences, therefore, no reason for war or conflict. In 1541-42, Cartier established a colony at the mouth of the Riviere du Cap-Rouge near Stadacona. He named this colony Charlesbourg-Royal. A fur trade was established with the Aboriginals, creating a strong relationship.
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