Rabbit Proof Fence Comparison Between Movie and Book

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Rabbit Proof Fence has been published both as a book and as a movie. Being a reader or a viewer entirely changes our point of view on the story. As a reader, we get descriptive insight on the situations and emotions of the characters. We are then able to re-create these visually using our imagination and have endless freedom doing so. As a viewer, our creativity is somewhat restricted. We do not imagine the characters’ physical appearance, the locations or the overall situations in the same way as in a book. These elements are already given to us. Throughout this essay I will be exploring how the music and the filming creates a contrast between reading the book with elaborate descriptions. Emotions are felt entirely differently from reading the book to watching the movie. From a personal point of view, I felt much more touched by the movie. Having less dialogue and descriptions in my point of view enables a person to really feel as if they are a part of the story. Music in a movie plays a crucial role. In Rabbit Proof Fence, most of the time, the music consists of melancholic music; often, a heavy and deep drumbeat is heard. When the girls are taken away from their families, A scene that differs greatly from the book to the movie on hitting our emotions was when the girls are taken away from their families. In the movie, this scene is extremely dramatic. We get a film-shot back and forth of the girls leaving with their expressive faces, as well as the mothers crying and moaning, falling on the floor out of desperation and exasperation. Visually we see the girls being taken away, slowly getting increasingly further away. This makes it extremely emotional and expressive for the viewer. In the book, the expressions of the little girls are described as “…tears streaming down their cheeks” (44) and “The two frightened and miserable girls began to cry, silently at first, then uncontrollably…” (45). Although when reading this we get a reasonably clear image in our...
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