Queen Sheba

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  • Topic: Solomon, History of Ethiopia, Queen of Sheba
  • Pages : 6 (2278 words )
  • Download(s) : 209
  • Published : April 23, 2013
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I would like to engage on a quest to identify the Queen of Sheba. Having read the rather newly published co-authored book by John Ashton and David Down, Unwrapping the Pharaohs, who states that the Queen of Sheba would be identified with the Egyptian Queen/Pharaoh, Hatshepsut. I have often referred to sources, even Christian authors and archeologists that identify the Queen of Sheba as being from the South Arabian capital, "Marib in Yemen." With the new archaeological discoveries, including the body of Queen Hatshepsut, and the many presentations, it will be interesting to discover the truths about the great pharaoh. Secular and many Christian sources seem to parrot the same theories which also contradict the archeological interpretations of the discoveries of Sheba and the discoveris of the Queen Hatshepsut in Egypt. Perhaps while the discovery of Sheba supports the Biblical mention of the place as having actually existed; but does this necessarily mean that a queen from this place actually visited Solomon? Or that a person from this place is the famous Queen of Sheba and the same that Jesus alludes? Perhaps new lights will shed a spark of truth and further qualify or authenticate the Bible as the inspired word of God. More than this, if historians and archeologists can provide enough evidence to support the Queen of Sheba as Hatshepsut, perhaps totally new discoveries will significantly impact knowledge of this time period in Egyptian history and the relationship between King Solomon and Egypt at this time. Truth is challenged by fiction; many times fiction becomes truth. The ultimate importance of this topic is Biblically and historically related. The Bible is the greatest book ever written! It is the greatest story- HIS story- of how God created man and gave him freedom of choice. His story tells and instructs in the greatest characteristics any human is capable of possessing, that of an unending and unconditional love. Some of the books of the Bible are excellent historical books, as a matter of fact, the earliest historical books that we have. And, quiet, accurate, because we have cross-references from other sources, and they are found to be most very precise so they are very important. This discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls was the most famous event in Biblical archeology, but it was, by no means, the first. The urge to explore Biblical history has a venerable tradition. It's a search that began in the Holy Land but would lead to Mesopotamia. Throughout history, crusaders, mystics, and believers have been drawn to sites where the great Bible stories took place; but with the arrival of the nineteenth century, a new kind of pilgrim sought to fortify their belief in the Bible through the infant science of archeology. This fortification give rise to the question concerning the identities of the Queen of Sheba and Hatshepsut, Queen and Pharaoh of Egypt. Much speculation cause debate among scholars, but a picture is worth a thousand words, they say. A somewhat nebulous figure, the Queen of Sheba (fl. 10th century BCE)- known also as Bilgis and as Makeda- figures prominently in Judaic, Islamic, and Ethiopian traditions. Her legendary voyage to meet Solomon, King of Israel, has inspired centuries of speculation about her kingdom and influence in the ancient world. Modern day Ethiopians believe her, as the mother of their first Emperor, Menilek I, to be the ultimate maternal ancestor of the dominant Ethiopian royal dynasty.

A Queen of Legend
Little has been verified about the Queen of Sheba's life- in fact, even such basic details as her given name and the exact location of her kingdom remain uncertain. Tradition places her date of birth in the latter half of the 11th century BCE and her death in approximately 955 BCE; although her kingdom is referred to as both to the south and to the east of Israel scholars generally believe her to have ruled an area in northern Africa roughly equivalent to modern-day Ethiopia, a...
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