Hatshepsut

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You’re standing in the desert, with the sun shimmering off the sand. You’re surrounded by many magnificent monuments. You wonder “Who could have built all of these?” Many of these were built by one person, Hatshepsut, the first female pharaoh.

Hatshepsut didn't start out as a pharaoh, in fact no one expected her to do anything very great at all. She was the daughter of Queen Ahmose. Later she married Thutmose II, who was not of royal blood. Together they had no sons, only a daughter. Thutmose had a son with someone of none royal blood. His son was named a Thutmose III.

Hatshepsut became pharaoh shortly after her husband’s death. At first she ruled as guarding for her stepson, but as she grew into the role of a leader, she took on the title of pharaoh as well as the power. She began to call her self Maatkare (Maat-ka-re), Keeper of Justice. Hatshepsut became a popular and powerful pharaoh, something she couldn't have become with out help and support of the priests and nobles.

Hatshepsut built many monuments and temples, including the Temple of Hatshepsut. She brought ebony, ivory, gold, incense trees, leopard skins, apes and monkeys, all from the land of Punt. She also built the capital of Egypt, Thebes, and many sphinxes. Hatshepsut did this and much more to show her capability as a pharaoh.

In order to accomplish it all, she hired a first rate architect called Senmut. He was the most important and capable administrator of that time. Hatshepsut gave him unusual privileges for a non-royal male. Much of the monuments she built were designed by Senmut.

Hatshepsut was one of the four female pharaohs. She built many things and she brought back many valuable things for her people. Despite being pharaoh, she was always trying to justify her rule as a god-king. She wanted to make sure she was not doubted to be a true pharaoh. She wanted to be remembered for eternity.
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