Psychology Case Study Analysis

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Gerlock, A. A. (2004). Domestic violence and post-traumatic stress disorder severity for participants of a domestic violence rehabilitation program. Military Medicine, 169(6), 470-474.

Introduction:

The purpose of April Gerlock’s research is to explain a current domestic violence program- who is involved, how the program works to encourage completion, descriptions of people who complete the program and do not complete the program. This program is specifically designed for active duty military and veterans. Gerlock is specifically studying what factors make domestic violence more likely and what factors make men more likely to complete the program.  

Method:

62 known domestic violence perpetrators were studied from this program in a six month period during 1997. There were four phases to the program- assessment, orientation, rehabilitation, and maintenance. Participants had to successfully complete each phase before moving on to the next. In order to study the participants methodically, an initial interview was given about their history with domestic violence. Nine follow up research instruments were given after the interview. These measured things such as drug abuse, self-esteem, and PTSD.  

Results:

Researchers looked for a correlation between severity of PTSD and severity of Domestic Violence. They found that “PTSD severity also significantly correlated to their reports of DV [domestic violence] in their family of origin.” (Gerlock 2004). Also, researchers studied men that completed the program verses men that did not and found the following: “Of the demographic variables, employment and age significantly distinguished completers from noncompleters. The violence variables that were significantly different between the two groups were court-mandated status and court monitoring.” (Gerlock 2004).  

Discussion:

As a result of her research, Gerlock ascertained “we do know there was a correlation between child witnessing of DV, PTSD (from civilian or military trauma, and frequency and severity of DV.” (Gerlock 2004). However, it is important to remember that the batterers came from a small sample during a limited time period. Therefore, it would be hard to generalize outcomes.

Stapleton, J. A., Taylor, S., & Asmundson, G. J. (2007). Efficacy of various treatments for PTSD in battered women: Case studies. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 21(1), 91-102.

Introduction:

The purpose of this study is to evaluate therapies such as exposure therapy, Eve Movement Desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), and relaxation therapy in women suffering from PTSD as a result of domestic violence. In this study, the results of therapies were compared between women with and without PTSD.

 
Method:

Four battered women and fifty six people suffering from other trauma were recruited through physicians and advertisements. Participants were studied using four measures associated with PTSD from the DSM-IV-TR. Their results were compared from before treatment to after treatment to see if they still qualified for the PTSD diagnosis. Patients were randomly selected to partake in eight 90 minute session of either exposure therapy, EMDR, or relaxation therapy  

Results:

After the eight sessions of therapy it was found that, “exposure therapy was associated with a better outcome than EMDR and relaxation, and the latter treatments did not differ from one another in efficacy.” (Stapleton, Taylor, and Adsmundson 2007). This was true for both the combined sample of participants suffering from general trauma and the battered women. Findings also show that on many of the pretreatment tests, the battered women had higher scores, and thus more severe symptoms, than the combined trauma group.  

Discussion:

EMRD and relaxation therapy are not viable options for treatment of battered women. However, even the use of exposure therapy is only effective when the woman is no longer in immediate danger of abuse. For future...
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