Psychiatric Disorders, Diseases and Drugs

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Psychiatric Disorders, Diseases and Drugs
Psychiatric Disorders, Diseases and Drugs

Axia University
Instructor: Allen Meyer
Date: July 31, 2010

Axia University
Instructor: Allen Meyer
Date: July 31, 2010

Avery Paco

Avery Paco

Schizophrenia, emotional disorders, Anxiety and Tourette’s syndrome are all classified as psychiatric disorders. There is a thin line between neuropsychological disorders and psychiatric disorders. Though the two types of disorders are a result of a dysfunctional brain, the brains malfunctions which create psychiatric disorders are blurry. Furthermore, psychiatric disorders are linked to environmental forces and are thought to be, "all in the persons head." As researchers become educated on psychiatric disorders they are able to create treatments to alleviate the patient from the disease.

The NIH & National Library of Medicine (2008) Web site defines Schizophrenia in five different categories: catatonic, disorganized, paranoid, residual, and undifferentiated. Each category has its own set of symptoms, but Schizophrenia as a whole creates a delusional picture of reality which disrupts the person’s behavior, logic and emotions. MSN Movies (2009) Web site discusses the movie A Beautiful Mind which is about Noel Peace prize winner John Forbes Nash Jr. who suffered from a Paranoid Schizophrenia. Nash was a well renowned Mathematician. Throughout his life Nash struggled with his disease convincing himself he could conquer the illness. The disease raged within him, he had a hard time distinguishing what was real and unreal. Nash was certain the CIA needed his assistance so he went above and beyond to decipher codes for the CIA, neglecting his reality for this altered reality created in his mind. Since John Nash's era advances have been made to treat Schizophrenia. In the 1950's and early 1960's chlorpromazine was used on patients prior to surgery to alleviate swelling, the surgeon noticed the medicine acted as  a relaxer to the patients and recommended chlorpromazine to relax hard to control psychotic patients. Though the Chlorpromazine did not calm the patients, the medicine showed potential on alleviating some symptoms in Schizophrenic patients. Throughout the research process Chlorpromazine brought side effects which are symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Researchers concluded that people suffering from Parkinson's disease die from a minute level of dopamine. Schizophrenics display a high-level of dopamine. Therefore Parkinson's and Schizophrenia seem to be on the opposite end of the spectrum. A breakthrough emerged in the dopamine theory with Carlsson and Lindqvist. The duo studied the Chlorpromazine in relation to Schizophrenia and revised the dopamine theory of Schizophrenia. Chlorpromazine was found to block dopamine receptors instead of the original theory of reducing dopamine levels. Therefore, the duo concluded through research that Schizophrenia was not due to high-levels of dopamine, but with over activity at the dopamine receptors.(Pinel,2007)

Neuroleptics and Antipsychotic drugs are known to alleviate symptoms associated with Schizophrenia. According to Pinel (2007), clozapine is a type of Neuroleptic that does not contain side effects associated with Parkinson's disease. On the contrary the medication is known to cause blood disorders. Neuroleptic medication is used to block the dopamine receptors though it takes time for Schizophrenic symptoms to assuage. Though Neuroleptics help Schizophrenics only certain patients benefit. Schizophrenic patients suffering from hallucinations and incoherence react to the medication. However; Schizophrenics suffering from cognitive defects are not affected. The NIH & National Library of Medicine (2008) Web site mentioned atypical antipsychotics have proven to treat symptoms for Schizophrenia with few side effects and is the best option for those suffering with Schizophrenia. Emotional disorders are another form of a psychiatric...
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