Psy/340 Wk4 Genetics Evaluation

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* Genetics, Brain Structure, and Behavior Presentation Evaluation * Psych/340
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Bipolar- Team B
Crazy or Illness
In my previous experiences and conversations with various individuals, the overall interpretation or misconception of bipolar disease is that the person is “”crazy. What do people really consider or mean by the term crazy? As displayed by Team B’s behavior presentation, Bipolar disorder is a mental illness that is also referred to as maniac-depressive illness, characterized by unusual changes in the persons energy, mood, activity level, and how they are able to follow through with day-to-day activities (Bipolar Disorder, P. 1). The first lesson in differentiating the difference in “crazy” and bipolar is that a person can live a close to normal, if not completely normal life with proper care and treatment.

Behavior or Functional Changes
Bipolar disorder is described as a manic-depressive disorder that causes changes in behavior in the individual and is broken down into four categories: Cyclothymic Disorder, Bipolar disorder I and II, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Individuals suffering from bipolar disorder experience severe mood swings ranging from lows to highs of mania and often feelings of sadness, depression, and sadness. In most causes individuals with bipolar experience mood shifts a few times a year, and several times a day while others experience depression and sadness simultaneously.

Neurological Changes
Individuals suffering from bipolar disorder experience changes in levels of Dopamine, Serotonin and Norepinephrine. These chemicals have a role in how the brains deal with stress, incentive, decision making, and cognitive functions. As the chemicals take a change in balance it has a critical affect on the individual experiencing the change. Patients whom experience and increase in dopamine experience symptoms classified as mania (Butts&Young, 2009). Norepinephrine can cause the individual to experience large amounts of energy spurts. Studies show that brain damage can occur if the patient experiences chemical fluctuations in the brain over a long period of time. Memory loss is a symptom due to the damage in the brain caused by bipolar disorder.

Team B’s presentation identifies the four classifications of bipolar according to the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) which are: Bipolar I, Bipolar II, Bipolar Not Otherwise Specified (BP-NOS), and Cyclothymia. A person suffering from Bipolar I will experience symptoms of a mixed or manic episode lasting for a week or two or manic symptoms that require immediate medical attention. A manic episode is a timeframe when a person’s mood is elevated, expansive or notably irritable. During the symptoms of depression or mania, the person’s normal thoughts, motives, and actions are interfered with. Bipolar II is a more severe form of bipolar because the depressive episode is not consistent like bipolar I, and has changing patterns which is known as hypomanic episodes. Bipolar Disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) has symptoms that are not the same as I nor as II, they do not last for a long period of time so the patient may only show signs of simply being ill. Team B did a great job of explaining the symptoms of bipolar disorder.

Damage
In the presentation of Team B, the team demonstrated great knowledge by identifying and providing evidence that patients suffering from bipolar disorder have enlarged Ventricles and Amygdala in the brain area, and suffers from impaired cognitive function. Team B gave information on the chemicals Dopamine, Serotonin, and...
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