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Precious vs Push

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While reading Push, by Sapphire you are engaged in Precious’ every thought, whether it was random, or a part of what was going on in that very moment. You knew her responses to what was said to her, even if she did not respond aloud to what was being said. In the book, her own personal thoughts were intertwined with the dialect of the story. I enjoyed that aspect of the book, while in the film if you were to here all of the random thoughts and responses it would seem to be too much going on, and to confuse the reviewer. I enjoyed the fact that in the film I could look at the expression on Precious’ face and know, courtesy of the book, exactly what she was thinking. A film adaptation of a book should complement the book, still telling the story accurately and getting the characters personality and struggles or successes across and I believe the film Precious did just that. I can appreciate the book, but I am more drawn into the characters in the film than in the book. The book and the film work together and bounce off of one another to draw out what the other left dormant. In the book, you learn the stories of the classmates of the alternative school Precious was at, in the film they were able to come alive. You see ample personality in all of the girls in the film. Reading the book first, I paid more attention to the girl’s personalities in the film, maybe for the sake of comparing and contrasting, but with the book and the film combined I feel like I know those girls. In the film, the teacher of the Pre-G.E.D class, Ms. Rain was cast as a fair-skinned woman, pretty with nice hair. In the book, she was described as a darker skinned woman with dred locked hair. I enjoyed that the role was cast to fair skinned women and she was a valuable character. Yes, this woman fought for Precious sake in the film and the book, but the casting fairer skinned Ms. Rain I feel could be used to inspire Precious. Emphasized more in the book than the film, you hear...