Pre Civil War Opposition

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Pre Civil War Slavery Opposition
Since 1776 American settlers owned African slaves for economic advancement, but by the mid 1800’s slavery became a custom of the past, and change was necessary for further American prosperity. Southerners were highly dependent, and supportive of slavery, however many moral arguments and political actions went toward the opposition to the spread of slavery including the Missouri compromise, the Compromise of 1850, and the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

The Missouri Compromise was one of the political actions towards prohibiting slavery in new territory. It was a two-part political action by Henry Clay, he would first admit Missouri to the union as a free state, and was balanced by Maine’s admission. Secondly all new territories from the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 were excluded of slavery. (Thomas Jefferson Purchased Louisiana in 1803 from France to prosper economically, by doing this he rid the French of the ports of New Orleans, and freed the passage of the Mississippi).Without this compromise lower Missouri would have been admitted as a slave state, and slavery would have been permitted in the newly gained territories of Louisiana. These prohibitions aided in preventing the spread of slavery into new territories therefore limiting it and further preventing new support. Other political actions occurred that further opposed the development of slavery. The Compromise of 1850 was a political action that occurred that had many components towards the opposition of slavery. First, after the Mexican-American War, California was immediately admitted to the Union as a free state, and quickly prospered economically because of its gold-rich land.The Utah, and New Mexico territories were open to slavery by popular sovereignty, there was little population of slave holders there so these territories remained free of slavery. It also abolished all slave trade in the capital (Washington D.C.), which was ironic in the fact that the slave trade took...
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