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CONTENTS

A. The overview of Languages in the United States…………………………………………………………….2
B. Official language status………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
C. Immigrant languages……………………………………………………………………………………………………..6
D. American English and the development………………………………………………………………………….7
E. Regional Differences……………………………………………………………………………………………………….8
F. American English vs. British English…………………………………………………………………………………10
I- Pronunciation and Spelling………………………………………………………………………………..10
II- Grammar and Vocabulary……………………………………………………………………………….. 17

Presenter: Tran Huy Nguyen Nam Phuong

A. THE OVERVIEW OF LANGUAGES IN THE UNITED STATES

LANGUAGES IN THE UNITED STATES|
Official language(s)| None at federal level|
Main language(s)| English (82.1%)Spanish (10.7%)Other Indo-European (3.8%)Asian and Pacific island languages (2.7%)Other languages (0.7%)| Indigenous language(s)| Navajo, Central Alaskan Yup’ik, Dakota, Western Apache, Keres, Cherokee, Zuni, Ojibwe, O’odham, etc…| Main immigrant language(s)| Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Italian| Sign language(s)| American Sign LanguageHawaii Pidgin Sign LanguagePlains Indian Sign Language|

* Approximately 337 languages are spoken or signed by the population, of which 176 are indigenous to the area. * 52 languages formerly spoken in the country’s territory are now extinct.

B. OFFICIAL LANGUAGE STATUS

* The United States does not have a national official language. * Nevertheless, American English (referred to in the US as simply English) is the primary language used for legislation, regulation, executive orders, treaties, federal court rulings, and all other official pronouncements. * Spanish is the second most common language in the United States. It is spoken by over 12% of the population. The United States holds the world’s fifth largest Spanish-speaking population.

* There have been several proposals to make English the national language in amendments to immigration reform bills, but none of these bills has become law. * The situation is quite varied at the state and territorial levels: * Some states mirror the federal policy of adopting no official language. * Others adopt English alone.

* Others officially adopt English as well as local languages. * Still others adopt a policy of bilingualism.
* One state is officially trilingual.

Place| English official| Other language(s)|
Alabama| Yes| No|
Alaska| Yes| No|
American Samoa| Yes| Samoan|
Arizona| Yes| No|
Arkansas| Yes| No|
California| Yes| No|
Colorado| Yes| No|
Connecticut| No| No|
Delaware| No| No|
District of Columbia| No| No|
Florida| Yes| No|
Georgia| Yes| No|
Guam| Yes| Chamorro|
Hawaii| Yes| Hawaiian|
Idaho| Yes| No|
Illinois| Yes| No|
Indiana| Yes| No|
Iowa| Yes| No|
Kansas| Yes| No|
Kentucky| Yes| No|
Louisiana| No| No|
Maine| No| No|
Maryland| No| No|
Massachusetts| No| No|
Michigan| No| No|
Minnesota| No| No|
Mississippi| Yes| No|
Missouri| No| No|
Montana| Yes| No|
Nebraska| Yes| No|
Nevada| No| No|
New Hampshire| Yes| No|
New Jersey| No| No|
New Mexico| No| No|
New York| No| No|
North Carolina| Yes| No|
North Dakota| Yes| No|
Northern Mariana Islands| Yes| Chamorro, Carolinian|
Ohio| No| No|
Oklahoma| Yes| No|
Oregon| No| No|
Pennsylvania| No| No|
Puerto Rico| Yes| Spanish|
Rhode Island| No| No|
South Carolina| Yes| No|
South Dakota| Yes| No|
Tennessee| Yes| No|
Texas| No| No|
U.S. Virgin Islands| Yes| No|
Utah| Yes| No|
Vermont| No| No|
Virginia| Yes| No|
Washington| No| No|
West Virginia| No| No|
Wisconsin| No| No|
Wyoming| Yes| No|

*Bilingual:
* New...
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