Power of Dreams

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The Power of Dreams
Aspiration is the fortitude that enables humanity to overcome barriers and achieve the impossible. However, the process by which you realize your dreams is consequential and may end in a nightmare. Achieving your aspirations and dreams in a selfish or negative manner will result in them turning into your or someone else`s nightmare. In F. Scott Fitzgerald`s The Great Gatsby, William Shakespeare`s Macbeth and Catherine Lim`s Paper, the characters Myrtle Wilson, Macbeth and Tay Soon all have dreams which end in theirs and someone else's nightmare because they are achieved through contradictory and negative ways. However, their dreams differ in what they represent and what achieving them will mean for their future.

Someone's dream is also his or her own nightmare. Myrtle Wilson, Macbeth and Tay Soon all feel as though their lives need to be bettered and that this can only be achieved through gaining either significant wealth or luxuries or gaining supreme power. However, this dream will end in their nightmare, as they will all die for chasing it. Myrtle feels as though her life as a lower-middle class wife of a lacklustre mechanic is mundane and redundant. Therefore, she frequently partakes in outings with her lover Tom Buchanan who is married to Daisy. This dream of becoming wealthy leads to her tragic death. Myrtle's death is a direct result of her ambitious effort to live a more affluent lifestyle. She mistakes a car driven by Daisy to be driven by Tom and foolishly runs to meet it. Myrtle in way tries to arrive at her dream by working hard and distinguishing herself from the rest of the people living in the valley of ashes. She only tries to do so by being unchaste and cheating on her husband. Similarly, Macbeth's desire for kingship leads to his nightmare. Macbeth is tantalized by the feeling of power from the first time he is stimulated by it. He wants and needs the power associated with kingship. Macbeth states, "I will not be afraid...
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