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Project Management Approach for Business Process Improvement

Instructor: Prof. Hossein FatehSubmitted by: Shilpa Naidu Tavvala|

Table of Contents

1. Introduction to Project Management…………………………………………………3 2. Purpose of the Project Management Approach for Business Process Improvement…4 3. Overview of a Case Study: Process Changes for a Manufacturing Company………..8 4. The Project Plan………………………………………………………………………9 5. Project Results………………………………………………………………………..11 6. Summary……………………………………………………………………………...12 7. Bibliography…………………………………………………………………………..13

Introduction to Project Management
Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing, securing, managing, leading, and controlling resources to achieve specific goals. A project is a temporary endeavor with a defined beginning and end usually time-constrained and often constrained by funding or deliverables undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value. The temporary nature of projects stands in contrast with business as usual (or operations), which are repetitive, permanent, or semi-permanent functional activities to produce products or services. In practice, the management of these two systems is often quite different, and as such requires the development of distinct technical skills and management strategies. Regardless of your industry or mission, project management is the value driver that helps your organization gets the most out of its performance. When tailored, or “fit”, to an organization’s culture, project management brings value by improving: * The execution of strategy, through repeatable, reliable performance and standardization; * The integration within the organization, through elimination of “silos” and better communication and collaboration; * The learning that a projectized organization undergoes as it explores new products, processes and markets.

Purpose of Project Management Approach for Business Process Improvement Business Process Improvement (BPI) to an organization should be as essential and natural as breathing is to life. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Process Improvement is frequently thought of as disruptive, expensive, time consuming and ineffective. In short, BPI is better avoided than attempted. In this article, we will examine the need for BPI, the reasons organizations shun it and offer a viable alternative to not improving processes. Process improvement initiatives are continuous. By ensuring that the initiative is managed as a strategic project, there are increased opportunities for success. As organizations grow, they need to continuously analyses and refine their processes to ensure they are doing business as effectively and efficiently as possible. Fine-tuning processes gives an organization a competitive advantage in a global marketplace. Process improvement is a strategy and a tool to help an organization meet its long-term goals and objectives. One key goal for all organizations is to meet the demands of their clients, both internal and external. Clients' needs change, whether due to economic factors, new product introductions, mergers or acquisitions, expansion or contraction. Continuously reviewing processes for potential improvements and efficiencies enables companies to adapt effectively to their clients' changing needs. Sometimes improving one process may inadvertently have an adverse effect on other processes. For example, let's say a company changes its sales order processing. Once that process is improved, it becomes apparent that the improvement in that process has created a backlog in order fulfillment in the manufacturing department. A project management approach would address such issues as part of the risk planning, and the order fulfillment process would have been reviewed as an extension of the sales order process. Or, the initial project would have been assessed to determine if making changes...
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