Plan and Information Officer

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DEFINATION

Diversity management is a strategy that is intended to foster and maintain a positive workplace environment. Usually initiated by Human Resources professionals and managed by department heads and supervisors, an effective diversity management program will promote recognition and respect for the individual differences found among a group of employees. The idea of this management style is to encourage employees to be comfortable with diversity in the workplace and develop an appreciation for differences in race, gender, background, sexual orientation or any other factors that may not be shared by everyone working in the same area of the company

The practice of addressing and supporting multiple lifestyles and personal characteristics within a defined group. Management activities includes educating the group and providing support for the acceptance of and respect for various racial, cultural, societal, geographic, economic and political backgrounds.

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/diversity-management.html#ixzz2Ok0anaik

The management and leadership of a workforce with the goal of encouraging productive and mutually beneficial interactions among the employees of an organization. Managing diversity aims at providing employees with backgrounds, needs, and skill sets that may vary widely with the opportunity to engage with the company and their co-workers in a manner that produces an optimal work environment and the best possible business results for the company.

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/managing-diversity.html#ixzz2Ok14TekW

Managing Workplace Diversity
NEW WAYS OF WORKING TOGETHER
In the new technologically oriented companies, employees are more highly skilled and educated than ever. Old hierarchies and authoritarian bosses who dictate orders are fading into the archaic past. More common are: • self-managing work teams

• leaders who facilitate team meetings and help teams to reach consensus • consultants and technical experts who function more as professionals than • as traditional employees

Relationships with teammates, customers, and suppliers, and the information that flows among them, are the lifeblood of the organization. Corporations are increasingly built upon trust, collaboration, cooperation, and teamwork. In such organizations, it’s more obvious than ever that people are the most valuable resource, that how we work together creates energy and innovation or decay and demoralization, that our interactions spark the knowledge and information that fuel organizational growth and success. In summary, key trends that point to the need for new people skills are: • A shortage of qualified, educated workers means companies must be more responsive to workers’ needs and expectations. • The U.S. workforce is becoming dramatically more diverse at all levels. Workers expect more accommodation to their needs and identities than in the past. Fewer workers are willing to compromise their unique cultural characteristics for the sake of “fitting in” with corporate cultures built on narrow, exclusive values and norms. • The global marketplace that now affects most American corporations is intensely competitive, making qualified employees more crucial than ever for providing the quality, innovation, and productivity companies need to compete. • The growth of these sub cultural groups means a growth of sub cultural market segments. Companies need a workforce that “looks like America” to project a multicultural company image, contribute to marketing insights, and relate well to multicultural customers. • Success in the global marketplace depends on building profitable relationships with people in all the countries where an organization does business. Diverse people skills are as powerful in the global marketplace as they are in the American workplace-and can be readily expanded to include other cultures and environments....
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