Physioex Exercise 10 Acid/Base Balance

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Respiratory Acidosis and Alkalosis

Activity 1: Normal Breathing

1.At 20 seconds, pH = 7.4
2.At 40 seconds, pH = 7.4
3.At 60 seconds, pH = 7.4
4.Did the pH level of the blood change at all during normal breathing? If so, how? No, the pH level of the blood did not change during normal breathing. 5.Was the pH level always within the “normal” range for the human body? Yes, the pH level was always within the normal range for human body. 6.Did the PCO2 level change during the course of normal breathing? If so, how? No, the PCO2 level did not change during the course of normal breathing.

Activity 2a: Hyperventilation – Run 1

1.At 20 seconds, pH = 7.45
2.At 40 seconds, pH = 7.53
3.At 60 seconds, pH = 7.65
4.Maximum pH = 7.66
5.Did the pH level of the blood change at all during this run? If so, how? Yes, the pH level fluctuate from 7.40 to 7.66 during this run. 6.Was the pH level always within the “normal” range for the human body? If not, when was the pH value outside of the normal range, and what acid/base imbalance did this pH value indicate? The pH level was not within the normal range for human body. The pH level was outside of the normal range after 20 seconds, pH level above 7.45. The pH value indicate state of alkalosis. 7.Did the PCO2 level change during the curse of this run? If so, how? PCO2 level fluctuate from 19.7 to 40.

8.If you observed an acid/base imbalance during this run, how would you expect to renal system to compensate for this condition? The renal system will respond by excreting more HCO3- from the body in urine causing a decrease in plasma pH. 9.How did the hyperventilation trace differ from the trace for the normal breathing? Did the tidal volumes change? The trace from normal breathing was ranging within 2 to 3 liters and the hyperventilation trace was ranging from 1 to 4 liters. Hyperventilation trace moved faster than the normal breathing trace. Yes, the tidal volumes changed. 10.What might cause a person to hyperventilate?

Hyperventilation is commonly a result of traveling to high altitude or may be brought on by fever or anxiety.

Activity 2b: Hyperventilation – Run 2

1.What happened to the trace after the 20-second mark when you stopped the hyperventilation? Did the breathing return to normal immediately? Explain your observation. After the 20-second mark breathing did not return to normal immediately. Breathing was constant for about 10 seconds. The tracing stayed at 2.5 liters for about 10 seconds. Then resumed to normal breathing with the tracing fluctuating from 2 to 3 liters.

Activity 3: Rebreathing

1.At 20 seconds, pH = 7.34
2.At 40 seconds, pH = 7.31
3.At 60 seconds, pH = 7.25
4.Did the pH level of the blood change at all during this run? If so, how? The pH level dropped as time went by, from 7.34 at 20 seconds to 7.25 at 60 seconds. 5.Was the pH level always within the “normal” range for the human body? If not, when was the pH value outside of the normal range, and what acid/base imbalance did this pH value indicate? No, the pH level was not within the normal range. The pH level was outside the normal range at 20 seconds when pH level fell below 7.35. The body is in the state of acidosis. 6.Did the PCO2 level change during the course of this run? If so, how? Yes, the PCO2 level changed during rebreathing, ranging from 40 to 53.95. 7.If you observed an acid/base imbalance during this run, how would you expect the renal system to compensate for this condition? The renal system responds by secreting H+ into the urine causing an increase in plasma pH. 8.How did the rebreathing trace differ from the trace for normal breathing? Did the tidal volumes change? Normal breathing tracing was between 2 to 3 liters and rebreathing traces ranges from 2 and pass 3 liters. Rebreathing traces fluctuated more in liters per second. 9.Give examples of respiratory problems that would result in pH and PCO2 patterns similar to...
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