Pcos

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  • Topic: Pregnancy, Metformin, Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Pages : 17 (3489 words )
  • Download(s) : 39
  • Published : May 17, 2013
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Pregnancy and PCOS

Everyone knows what pregnancy is, how it can affect the body over time, and that there are many factors that can affect the pregnancy. One thing that can affect the pregnancy that is little known about is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). If someone tells you that they have PCOS, you think to yourself, what is PCOS? Not many people know what is it off the top of their head, but in all actuality 1 in 4 women of reproductive age have PCOS, and not even know it.

What is PCOS

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome or what is commonly referred to as PCOS is…. Although when speaking of this syndrome, you would think that it would mean that there are cysts all over the ovaries. But that is not the case; it just means that there are small follicles or small sacs filled with fluid ((Eden, 2005)). Also, you do not need to have the cysts surgically removed like you would think of normal cysts in the body. When a woman has PCOS some of the common symptoms would consist of:

• Excess hair on the body

• acne and other skim problems

• Scalp hair loss

• Irregular or missing periods

• Heavy periods

• Fertility issues

• Insulin resistance

• Weight issues

Not everyone with PCOS will suffer from all of these symptoms but there is usually a combination of them to a certain degree, with the irregular periods, or lack thereof being one of the key signs. The basic or main reason for these symptoms is a very complex hormonal and metabolic imbalance in the body, which will affect the health and wellbeing of the individual. Be sure to cite your references throughout.

The Metabolic Side of PCOS

The hormones that are affected in a woman body are the male hormones that all women have in their body, androgens; the hormone testosterone for example of androgens. Before researchers and doctors were not sure, what in fact caused these high levels of male hormones was but later on they have linked it to an overproduction of insulin.

The insulin hormone is normally released from the pancreas after a meal and makes the sugar or glucose for the body, and is also stored in the liver. With having PCOS the glucose levels are not at a stable level as the body needs it to be so that the brain can function and know the way that the food should be broken down and build for your energy or your metabolism. The levels of glucose can both be too high or too low and cause diabetes if not under control. If your sugar levels are too high or what is also known as being hyperglycemic, it causes the person to be thirsty, a lot of bathroom visits for urination and possible fainting. If the sugar levels are too low, or also known as being hypoglycemic, can cause the person to have dizzy spells, shakiness and be confused. If the person eats too much then the sugar would be either stored in the liver, and excess is stores in fat cells which causes the weight gain, which causes the significant weight gain in a short amount of time, and usually leads to obesity, but that is not in all cases. The higher levels of insulin ultimately create the hormone imbalance, which causes the body to make more than usual levels of male hormones. The male hormones are the reason that causes the symptoms of the irregular periods, acne, and unwanted hair growth. Some of the hair growth is usually the kind that men would have such as facial hair and chest hair. The main cause of the body being insulin resistance is the type of diet that can cause the diabetes and the weight gain. A diet high in sugar and carbohydrates what increase these chances.

Genetics

Some researches and doctors also believe that genetic may play a part in PCOS (c (Eden, 2005) (Cheung, 2006)). They look for a history of irregular periods on the maternal side as well. Since this diagnosis is so new, there may be a chance that the mother or grandmother may have had...
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