Patterns of Time Use Among Overseas Students

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Research Report|
Patterns of time usage amongst overseas students|
Student name: TRINH Van KietStudent number: 4000114398Class: AE2AEnd Course date: 9 September 2012Teachers: Sylvia Forest Annabel Little| |
10/31/2012

Contents

Page
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….2
Methodology…………………………………………………………………………………3
Result…………………………………………………………………………………………….4
Discussion……………………………………………………………………………………...7
Appendix……………………………………………………………………………………….10
Reference……………………………………………………………………………………..12

INTRODUCTION
Time usage is the way in which different regular activities are utilised individually in particular circumstances. In order to examine, it can be separated by special characteristics. Specifically, there are four main categories of time usage. Necessary time represents activities which are performed such a part of one’s life, e.g. sleeping, eating and drinking. Contracted time stands for activities which seem to be acted under the condition of valid contracts such as paid work and regular education. Committed time describes activities such as house-work and shopping. Free time is a circumstance in which relaxation and enjoyment play an important role after individuals responded the three categories above. Time usage might differ across the age groups, genders and periods of time. For instance, in Australia, there are some either significant differences or similarities between young people (aged 15 to 24 years) and the older age groups. In 2006, a survey of Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) investigated the details about the time usage of Australians. In those who aged 15 to 24 years, it was determined that men on average spent almost two and a half hours per day studying, which were far less similar to that of women. In terms of shopping, men spent half of the time that the women did. Moreover, the ABS also pointed out that young men spent almost five hours a day on free time activities, which young women spent just over four hours on. Nevertheless, the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006 established only the Australians. Thus, another research has been done to discover the time usage amongst overseas students who aged 15 to 34 years. The aim of this research is to compare patterns of time usage between overseas students and their Australians contemporaries.

METHODOLOGY
On 19th October 2012, a survey concerned with time use was carried out among 50 overseas students at Navitas English College. The number of males and females, who aged 15 to 34 years, was almost equal. Furthermore, most of the sample was Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese. The rest of them were from Japan, Taiwan and Kuwait. The research was conducted by means of questionnaire that was administered informally and consisted of 12 close-ended questions. The questionnaire was given to respondents to complete. The questionnaire was also divided into 5 sections. The first section asked for demographic information such as gender and age. The four remaining questions gathered the details about time use in different ways such as necessary time (sleeping and personal care activities), contracted time (education and employment related activities), committed time (housework and shopping) and free time (time spent with other and free time activities). The results were collated and converted to percentages. That were also compared in terms of genders and represented into graphs and charts.

Result

Figure 1 illustrates the amounts of time weekly spent studying in percentages of overseas students. It is also divided into different genders and amounts of time. As can be seen, over two thirds of female overseas students spend around 20-25 hours to study compared with over a quarter of the males. On the other hand, there is another significant difference between genders for studying less than 20 hours in that the percentage of males is ten times higher than that of females. However, it is...
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