Partition of India Portrayed in the Novels

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Partition of India, Portrayed in the Novels

India suffered the stigma of slavery under British for about three centuries. When it got freedom, it was also not without paying the high cost in the form of partition. This historical event is significant in the world history not only as a political occurrence which gave birth to two nations, but as the most treacherous occasion for thousand of the men who lost their lives, hundreds of women who were raped & treated most ruthlessly and for countless number of children who found themselves orphaned & coerced to live the life of beggars. This most lethal incident in the history of India left an indelible mark on the psyche of every Indian & particularly on those Indians who have been the victim of this most dreadful will of God. Indian writers could not remain untouched from this shocking affair and used the medium of creative writing especially novels to lay bare the brutality, inhumanity & genocide of worst type.

The foremost attempt in this direction is taken by Khushwant Singh in his novel Train to Pakistan in which he depicted the trauma of the victims of partition. As he himself belongs to the community who remained the victim of this cruel fate, he could easily understand the pain of the people who fell prey to this plot. Not only he participated as a villager in the events of Mano Majra, an imaginative peaceful abode of communal harmony, but he narrated the whole tragedy as a detached observer also. He neither blamed Hindu, Muslims & even the evil Britishers; but emphasized that in this tragic incident not only a country was divided, but even the heart & the soul of the people got alienated. It is an agonizing tale of the people who got caught in the tempest of partition.

The Rape by Raj Gill holds political leadership responsible for the overall drama of partition & it’s devastating effects. He does not limit himself only up to the political consequences, but also...
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