Palm Jumeirah

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LIVE THE EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD

Launched in 2001, Palm Jumeirah is the icon that captivated the world’s attention. The first chapter of Palm Trilogy, Palm Jumeirah is known as the eighth wonder of the world. Helping solve Dubai’s beach shortage, the island has doubled Dubai’s existing coastline and will also double the number of beachfront hotels in the city. Along with world class residences and hotels, the island features unprecedented retail, exceptional leisure and premier entertainment options. It is expected to welcome 20,000 visitors a day. A monorail, the first of its kind in the region, will transport passengers conveniently to a variety of island locations. Fast becoming a reality, Palm Jumeirah is Dubai’s celebrated landmark and international attraction. 

Location:    
Jumeirah, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Project Type:     
Mixed-use development of commercial, retail, residential and hospitality offerings

Phases: 
Handover of villas and apartments, followed by hotel construction

Completion Date:
Handover of the first phase of Palm Jumeirah began December 2006

Concept and Design

Dubai, the fastest growing tourist destination in the world, was rapidly running out of beachfront. As a way to solve this beach shortage, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President and Prime Minister and Ruler of Dubai, had an idea to maximise beachfront, and a sketch evolved that was an island resembling a palm tree. The ingenious design of fronds fanning outward created more beachfront than would be accommodated by a traditional, circular island. From this initial concept, the idea of Palm Jumeirah was born and engineering planning then began. Preparation and Planning

An undertaking as phenomenal as Palm Jumeirah requires exceptional planning and world class engineering. The progress of the development was fuelled by years of research, attention to detail and a long term commitment toward success.

Design, coastal processes and infrastructure were studied extensively before a location assessment, focusing on environmental impact, was conducted. Engineers then tracked offshore wave conditions and meteorological data to inform the most effective design for The Crescent – one that would protect the inner island from waves and currents. Only after years of careful study, in these and other topics never before investigated, would the eighth wonder begin to take shape. 

Planning:

* 3 years of planning, 42 consulting firms and over 50 studies have helped to ensure Palm Jumeirah’s feasibility and sound construction. Marine ecology, traffic, population and business development continue to be studied closely.

Environmental Sustainability:

* Palm Jumeirah is made from natural materials only⎯ sand and rock.  It would have been easier, but less environmentally friendly, to build with steel and concrete instead. * The sea sand used to create Palm Jumeirah is more environmentally sustainable and more seismically stable than desert sand. * The island sand underwent a process called vibro-compaction to insure any further settlement should be less than one inch over the next 50 years. * During a 2 month operation in late 2005, marine experts working on behalf of Nakheel relocated 1,869 fish and other forms of marine life from one area of Palm Jumeirah construction site to open waters close by. 

The Crescent:

* The Crescent surrounds the island and acts a breakwater; it’s able to withstand a 4 metre wave. * At its deepest, the breakwater stands in 11 metres (35 feet) of the ocean and rises to 4 metres (13 feet) above sea level at low tide.  * Engineers placed openings on either side of The Crescent, allowing the seawater to be refreshed every 14 days in order to prevent the water trapped within the island fronds from becoming brackish. * With The Crescent securely in place, 5 million cubic metres (173 million cubic feet) of rock were positioned to...
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