Obesity in Schools

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Tim Shackleton
Professor Murphy
English 102 Composition
18 March 2013
Obesity Caused By School Lunch Servings Should Be At Fault
Over the past decade in the United States the rate of child obesity has been consistently increasing. A major cause to this increase in obesity is mainly caused by school children’s health over the recent years in relation to what they are eating has raised concerns of different parties when dealing with the situation. The problem that causes debate for this issue is the different views of parties that believe the food being served is perfectly healthy while, the other party believes that the cafeteria food is a problem on the children’s health. The parties that are concerned with the food that is being served in the cafeterias in the U.S. are parents of the children, health physicians doing research on the cafeterias diet which is offered that the school children consume, and other organizations. The other party believes that the food being served in the U.S. school systems is perfectly fine and follows FDA regulations, which is the School Nutrition Association, an organization that provides guidelines and works to make the food in the cafeterias healthy for the children.

Although, the School Nutrition Association argues that, their foods being served in different cafeterias in the U.S. serve to follow a strict guideline, different tests and research performed by health physicians show a dramatic difference in the statistical aspect of obesity in schools due to the food distribution these cafeterias serve the children every day. This problem raises lots of concerns with not only the parents of these children, but the National Government as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Preventions, states that, “Obese youth are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure. In a population-based sample of 5- to 17-year-olds, 70% of obese youth had at least one risk...
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