Note Taking and Reading Skills

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Note
 Taking,
 Listening,
 and
 Reading
 habits
 
 
Amy
 Green
  Miller-­‐Motte
 University
 
 

ABSTRACT
  This
 document
 discusses
 note
 taking
 using
 the
 Cornell
 system,
 practicing
 Active
  Listening,
 and
 reading
 habits
 by
 interrogating
 the
 text.
 
 

Note
 Taking,
 Active
 Listening,
 and
 Reading
 Habits
 

2
 

  Study
 skills/habits
 in
 general
 are
 subjects
 I
 am
 somewhat
 familiar
 with.
 I
  have
 researched
 these
 areas
 in
 the
 past
 and
 have
 been
 to
 faculty
 in-­‐services
 that
  address
 how
 to
 help
 our
 students
 do
 these
 things
 better.
 
 I
 have
 personally
 coached
  students
 that
 were
 struggling
 in
 different
 areas
 of
 note
 taking,
 listening,
 and
 good
  reading
 habits.
 
 It
 is
 exciting
 and
 different
 to
 be
 looking
 this
 information
 up
 for
  myself.
 I
 think
 it
 could
 only
 benefit
 me
 and
 also
 allow
 me
 to
 help
 my
 students
 better.
  The
 first
 skill
 I
 researched
 was
 Note
 Taking
 on
 the
 Dartmouth
 education
  website.
 
 Something
 I
 found
 very
 interesting
 was
 within
 the
 Cornell
 Note
 Taking
  System;
 the
 five
 R’s-­‐
 record,
 reduce,
 recite,
 reflect,
 and
 review.
 Record
 as
 much
  meaningful
 facts
 as
 possible
 during
 the
 lecture.
 Reduce
 and
 summarize
 information
  just
 lectured
 on.
 Recite
 and
 recall
 information
 by
 covering
 your
 notes
 up
 and
 only
  using
 the
 summary
 as
 a
 clue.
 Reflect
 from
 the
 notes
 taken
 on
 information
 learned
  arranging
 them
 into
 outlines,
 structures,
 and
 filing
 the
 information.
 Review
 the
  information,
 spending
 10
 minutes
 a
 week
 reviewing
 notes,
 that
 will
 help
 you
 to
  most
 likely
 retain
 the
 information
 (Dartmouth).
 
  Active
 listening
 is
 probably
 something
 everyone
 could
 benefit
 improving.
  The
 website
 www.mindtools.com
 that
 I
 researched
 this
 information
 stated
 that
  when
 talking
 or
 listening
 the
 person
 on
 the
 receiving
 end
 only
 takes
 in
 about
 25%-­‐ 50%
 of
 the
 information.
 
 I
 found
 that
 to
 be
 a
 huge
 number,
 but
 I
 believe
 it.
 The
  website
 gave
 some
 great
 tips
 on
 how
 to
 improve
 your
 active
 listening.
 First
 off
 pay
  attention
 to
 the
 speaker
 and
 give
 them
 your
 undivided
 attention,
 put
 aside
  distracting
 thoughts
 and
 always
 refrain
 from
 side
 conversations
 (Mindtools).
 Show
  them
 you
 are
 listening
 and
 use
 your
 own
 body
 gestures
 to
 show
 you
 are
 paying
  attention.
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