Negative Impacts of Cellphones

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 169
  • Published : March 4, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Janel Henggeler
Composition One
10 February 2013
Cell Phones: the Fast Track to the Destruction of Society
We were on our way into Manhattan for our monthly shopping trip to Wal-Mart. I was riding in the backseat as always, being the youngest. My oldest sister, Nicole, was in a state of the utmost euphoria, because today was the day she got her first cellphone. My parents made her a promise that if she was getting good grades they would buy her a cellphone her freshman year of high school. She would be the first one of her friends to get one, and she was ready to brag about it; however, my parents had some stipulations. The phone would stay at home during the school day as not to tempt her to text in class, the phone would not be used during family activities or dinner, and the phone would stay off until homework was complete. Nicole reluctantly agreed to all the restrictions and she picked out the prized phone. Unlike then, today the stipulations set by my parents are obsolete. All of the rules have become commonplace in society and are accepted by the majority of the nation. Cellphones have piloted society into a fallacy leading our youth into problems with school, safety, and communication, which has the potential to destroy personal relationships and etiquette in modern society. Starting with our youth, cellphones have created an assortment of problems in modern society. The progressing pressure of society on students to achieve in the classroom has caused students of all ages anxiety, thus leading them to alternative methods of obtaining information. While using different methods to get information is not a bad thing it can have its repercussions. If the student does not do well in school, modern society tells them that they will not get into college and they will never find a job, hence the pressure on students in very high. Students are carrying their cellphones from class to class, some having access to the Internet from smart phones. It’s easier for students to attain answers to tests or homework, not only with the Internet but also texting other classmates. Seventy-five percent of teenagers have cellphones, and a survey led by Scott Campbell, assistant professor at the University of Michigan, found that sixty-five percent of teens with cellphones take their phones to school with them everyday (Campbell). The survey also found that seventy-one percent of those students have admitted texting or accessing the Internet during class. With the rise of cellphones in the classroom it is causing students’ attention spans to disintegrate. Students have the ability to retrieve the same information the teacher instructs in an hour lesson within seconds. Some say students’ attention spans have shortened to no more than sixty seconds, and they have become oblivious to their surroundings due to lack of focus in eye to eye contact or word of mouth communication (Yusuf). Cellphones are negatively impacting our youth by causing sloppy studying habits.

One reason for the problem with cellphones in school is because people are unable to leave their cellphone at home; likewise, teens’ carrying their cellphone causes some to become addicted. While adolescents are relying more heavily on mobile communications the understanding of the risks involved need to be balanced with the understanding of the consequences. As people get into their car to go to work or school, most have their phone with them. Ten percent of drivers age sixteen to twenty-four are on their phone at any given time while driving (Nationwide), and forty percent of the nation’s teens have admitted to being in a car with a driver on their cellphone (Pew). When a phone is in the seat next to someone and they see the bright light flashing, signaling they have received a new message it is temping to look at; however, this results in their attention being taken off driving causing them to be distracted. Texting while driving has climbed to the number one source of...
tracking img