National Security

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  • Topic: NSA warrantless surveillance controversy, Security, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act
  • Pages : 3 (1024 words )
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  • Published : April 17, 2013
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National Security:
How Working Without Warrants Puts Us At Risk
Samantha Schmidt
English 112-L04
April 19, 2012

National Security: How Working Without Warrants Puts Us at Risk

After 9/11, the whole country was sent into a tailspin. The fact that the United States, one of the most powerful countries worldwide, had suffered such a blow was mind blowing. The people were terrified. So too insure that a tragedy of that magnitude never happened again, the government put into place many new precautions. The most noticeable precaution would of course be the security in airports. What used to be a fast and simple process became a long, intrusive, uncomfortable experience. However, the biggest change is almost undetectable. To prevent another terrorist attack the National Security Agency (NSA) was given the ability to place individuals under surveillance. That means watching their emails, internet searches, and even listening in on phone conversations. In the beginning it was understood that the NSA would have to obtain warrants before placing individuals under surveillance, but as time passed it became apparent that the NSA often skipped the warrant process. If the NSA has the correct amount of evidence to give them probable cause against a suspect then they should be obtaining warrants. The National Security Agency has been providing important information to the US Military and major US decision makers since 1972. The NSA is responsible for a very large amount of information passed down the lines. The agency also enables Network Warfare operations in order to defeat terrorist organization foreign, and domestic. (National Security Agency, 2011) A warrant is a piece of paper giving law enforcement the ability to search, and seize items or information when probable cause has been presented (Search, 2010). When obtaining warrants, law enforcement must show enough evidence to prove that they have...
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