Nanobotes

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  • Topic: Nanotechnology, Molecular nanotechnology, Molecular machine
  • Pages : 22 (6257 words )
  • Download(s) : 465
  • Published : August 24, 2010
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SERIAL NO: TITLE PAGE NO

1 ABSTRACT 1/24

2 INTRODUCTION 3/24

3 HISTORY 4/24

4 MOLECULAR NANOTECHNOLOGY 6/24

5 CARBON NANOTECHNOLOGY 7/24

6 TYPES OF NANOTECHNOLOGY 7/24

7 IMPACT ON EVERYDAY LIFE 9/24

8 PRODUCTS OF NT 10/24

9 APPLICATIONS OF NT 12/24

10ADVANTAGE OF NT 20/24

11DISADVANTAGE OF NT 21/24

12 FUTURE OF NT 21/24

13CONCLUSION 24/24

14REFERENCES 24/24

ABSTRACT

Nanotechnology, shortened to "nanotech", is the study of the controlling of matter on an atomic and molecular scale. Generally nanotechnology deals with structures of the size 100 nanometers or smaller in at least one dimension, and involves developing materials or devices within that size. Nanotechnology is very diverse, ranging from extensions of conventional device physics to completely new approaches based upon molecular self-assembly, from developing new materials with dimensions on the nanoscale to investigating whether we can directly control matter on the atomic scale.

There has been much debate on the future implications of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology has the potential to create many new materials and devices with a vast range of applications, such as in medicine, electronics and energy production. On the other hand, nanotechnology raises many of the same issues as with any introduction of new technology, including concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials, and their potential effects on global economics, as well as speculation about various doomsday scenarios. These concerns have led to a debate among advocacy groups and governments on whether special regulation of nanotechnology is warranted.

The first use of the concepts found in 'nano-technology' (but pre-dating use of that name) was in "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom," a talk given by physicist Richard Feynman at an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech on December 29, 1959. Feynman described a process by which the ability to manipulate individual atoms and molecules might be developed, using one set of precise tools to build and operate another proportionally smaller set, and so on down to the needed scale. In the course of this, he noted, scaling issues would arise from the changing magnitude of various physical phenomena: gravity would become less important, surface tension and vander Waals attraction would become increasingly more significant, etc.

Name – Swarnalipi Behera

Regd.no – 0601211053

Roll.no – 106321...
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