My Little Pony: the Magic of Gender Equality

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The Magic of Gender Equality

My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic is a critically acclaimed children’s animated series developed by Lauren Faust. The series is an update of Hasbro’s original 80s phenomenon. It shows themes that may seem typical on children’s programming such as moral values, gender equality, the meaning of friendship, teamwork, and helping those in need. However, what makes this show stand out from the rest? The show takes a different approach in children’s programming, using a technique that not only applies to girls, but to boys as well, with the characters’ distinct personalities, cultural references, and comedic charm. My Little Pony teaches its audience how to be a better person in society or in their community by presenting their individualism, freedom, and expression, even if it goes against gender norms.

The series takes place in the fictional town of “Ponyville” located in the magical land of “Equestria.” Centering on Twilight Sparkle, a magical unicorn pony, and all her pony friends; Applejack, Fluttershy, Rainbow Dash, Pinkie Pie, Rarity, and Spike the dragon. At first, Twilight Sparkle used to live in the Kingdom of Equestria as Princess Celestia’s pupil, but when Princess Celestia sends her to Ponyville on a job, she makes friends and desires to stay there. Thus Princess Celestia lets her stay, but with one condition, report back to her on what she learns about friendship. So Twilight Sparkle begins her journey in Ponyville, confronting troubles and doing everyday tasks with the help of her friends, which helps her understand the meaning of teamwork and friendship. The series presents a plot where it can teach its viewers good values.

In society, depending on your gender you have different responsibilities. As Lorber says, “As a social institution, gender is a process of creating distinguishable social statuses for the assignment of rights and responsibilities” (Lorber 341). However, in the series we see the opposite, gender...
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