Muslim League and Public Service Commission

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FEDERAL PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION FOR RECRUITMENT TO POSTS IN BPS–17, UNDER THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, 2007

Roll No.

ESSAY
TIME ALLOWED: THREE HOURS MAXIMUM MARKS: 100 NOTE: Write a COMPREHENSIVE essay (4000 – 5000 words) on any ONE of the topics listed below. Make sure you use different forms of discourse; viz: exposition, argument, persuasion, description and narration.

Q.1. Q.2. Q.3. Q.4. Q.5. Q.6. Q.7.

'The more developed a country, the more lethally it is armed.' Higher education as an agent of change. The future of mankind in a 'Global Warming' perspective. The image of Islam in the western world and responsibilities of the Muslim Ummah. A country is backward because its people are backward. Globalization and electronic media. "The present system of education must assume some of the responsibilities of our failures." Discuss. "Politics is the art of possible." Discuss. Terrorism as a new threat to the contemporary world.

Q.8. Q.9.

Q.10. The state of Women Rights in Pakistan.

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FEDERAL PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION FOR RECRUITMENT TO POSTS IN BPS–17, UNDER THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, 2007

Roll No.

ENGLISH (PRECIS & COMPOSITION)
TIME ALLOWED: THREE HOURS
Q.1.

MAXIMUM MARKS: 100

Make a précis of the given passage and suggest a suitable heading. (20+5) The author of a work of imagination is trying to affect us wholly, as human beings, whether he knows it or not; and we are affected by it, as human beings, whether we intend to be or not. I suppose that everything we eat has some other effect upon us than merely the pleasure of taste and mastication; it affects us during the process of assimilation and digestion; and I believe that exactly the same is true of any thing we read. The fact that what we read does not concern merely something called our literary taste, but that it affects directly, though only amongst many other influences, the whole of what we are, is best elicited, I think, by a conscientious examination of the history of our individual literary education. Consider the adolescent reading of any person with some literary sensibility. Everyone, I believe, who is at all sensible to the seductions of poetry, can remember some moment in youth when he or she was completely carried away by the work of one poet. Very likely he was carried away by several poets, one after the other. The reason for this passing infatuation is not merely that our sensibility to poetry is keener in adolescence than in maturity. What happens is a kind of inundation, or invasion of the undeveloped personality, the empty (swept and garnished) room, by the stronger personality of the poet. The same thing may happen at a later age to persons who have not done much reading. One author takes complete possession of us for a time; then another, and finally they begin to affect each other in our mind. We weigh one against another; we see that each has qualities absent from others, and qualities incompatible with the qualities of others: we begin to be, in fact, critical: and it is our growing critical power which protects us from excessive possession by anyone literary personality. The good critic – and we should all try to be critics, and not leave criticism to the fellows who write reviews in the papers – is the man who, to a keen and abiding sensibility, joins wide and increasingly discriminating reading. Wide reading is not valuable as a kind of hoarding, an accumulation of knowledge, or what sometimes is meant by the term 'a well-stocked mind.' It is valuable because in the process of being affected by one powerful personality after another, we cease to be dominated by anyone, or by any small number. The very different views of life, cohabiting in our minds, affect each other, and our own personality asserts itself and gives each a place in some arrangement peculiar to ourself. Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow: (20) Strong...
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