Motorcycle Outline Paper

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Touring motorcycle, Road, Motorcycle classifications
  • Pages : 1 (368 words )
  • Download(s) : 37
  • Published : May 28, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
There are many systems for classifying types of motorcycles, describing how the motorcycles are put to use, or the designer's intent, or some combination of the two. There are five main categories: cruiser, sport, touring, standard, and dual-purpose. Cruisers are styled after American machines from the 1930s to the early 1960s. Their engines are tuned for low-end torque, making them less demanding to ride because it is not necessary to shift as frequently to accelerate or maintain control. Sport bikes emphasize speed, acceleration, braking, and cornering on paved roads typically at the expense of comfort and fuel economy in comparison to less specialized motorcycles. Because of this, there are certain design elements that most motorcycles of this type will share. Sport bikes have comparatively high performance engines resting inside a lightweight frame. Although any motorcycle can be equipped and used for touring, touring motorcycles are specifically designed to excel at covering long distances. They have large displacement engines, fairings and screens that offer good weather and wind protection, large capacity fuel tanks, and a relaxed, upright seating position. Passenger accommodation is excellent and expansive luggage space is normal for this class. Sport touring motorcycles combine attributes of sport bikes and touring motorcycles. The rider posture is less extreme than a sport bike, giving greater long-distance comfort.  Accommodation for a passenger is superior to a sport bike as well, along with luggage capacity. Standards are versatile, general purpose street motorcycles. They are recognized primarily by their upright riding position, halfway between the reclining posture of the cruisers and the forward leaning sport bikes. Foot pegs are below the rider and handlebars are high enough to not force the rider to reach far forward, placing the shoulders above the hips in a natural position. Dual-sports, sometimes called dual-purpose or on/off-road...
tracking img