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3.1
There are different methods for opening cases. To learn how to open a particular computer case, consult the user manual or manufacturer's website. Most computer cases are opened in one of the following ways: The computer case cover can be removed as one piece.

The top and side panels of the case can be removed.
The top of the case may need to be removed before the side panels can be removed. 3.2
These are the power supply installation steps:
Insert the power supply into the case.
Align the holes in the power supply with the holes in the case. Secure the power supply to the case using the proper screws. | | |
| Optional ActivityVirtual Desktop: Power Supply 
System requirements for the virtual desktop include a minimum of 512 MB RAM and Windows 2000 or Windows XP operating system. Complete the power supply layer in the virtual desktop.Lab: Install the Power Supply Introduction Print and complete this lab. In this lab, you will install a power supply in a computer case. Recommended Equipment  Power supply with a compatible form factor to the computer case  Computer case  Tool kit  Power supply screws Step 1 Remove the screws from the side panels. Remove the side panels from the computer case. Step 2 Align the screw holes in the power supply with the screw holes in the case. Secure the power supply to the case with the power supply screws. Step 3 If the power supply has a voltage selection switch, set this switch to match the voltage in your area. What is the voltage in your area? How many screws secure the power supply in the case? What is the total wattage of the power supply? This lab is complete. Please have the instructor verify your work.|

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3.3
This section details the steps to install components on the motherboard and then install the motherboard into the computer case. After completing this section, you will meet these objectives: * Install a CPU and a heat sink/fan assembly. * Install the RAM. * Install the motherboard.|

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3.3.1
The CPU and the heat sink/fan assembly may be installed on the motherboard before the motherboard is placed in the computer case. CPU
Figure 1 shows a close-up view of the CPU and the motherboard. The CPU and motherboard are sensitive to electrostatic discharge. When handling a CPU and motherboard, make sure that you place them on a grounded antistatic mat. You should wear an antistatic wrist strap while working with these components. CAUTION: When handling a CPU, do not touch the CPU contacts at any time. The CPU is secured to the socket on the motherboard with a locking assembly. The CPU sockets today are ZIF sockets. You should be familiar with the locking assembly before attempting to install a CPU into the socket on the motherboard. Thermal compound helps to conduct heat away from the CPU. Figure 2 shows thermal compound being applied to the CPU. When you are installing a used CPU, clean the CPU and the base of the heat sink with isopropyl alcohol. Doing this removes all traces of old thermal compound. The surfaces are now ready for a new layer of thermal compound. Follow all manufacturer recommendations about applying the thermal compound. Heat Sink/Fan Assembly

Figure 3 shows the heat sink/fan assembly. It is a two-part cooling device. The heat sink draws heat away from the CPU. The fan moves the heat away from the heat sink. The heat sink/fan assembly usually has a 3-pin power connector. Figure 4 shows the connector and the motherboard header for the heat sink/fan assembly. Follow these instructions for CPU and heat sink/fan assembly installation: 1. Align the CPU so that the Connection 1 indicator is lined up with Pin 1 on the CPU socket. Doing this ensures that the orientation notches on the CPU are aligned with the orientation keys on the CPU socket. 2. Place the CPU gently into the socket.

3. Close the CPU load plate and secure it in place by closing the load lever and moving it under the load lever retention tab. 4....
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