Moral Theology - Premarital Sex

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TERM PAPER
Theology 104
Moral Theology – Pre-marital Sex

I. INTRODUCTION

Once, a long time ago when the majority of men were still misogynists and women didn't have the right to vote, sex was a serious discussion and a deed purely done by married men and women. Nowadays even seven year old kids know and do it. Premarital sex or a sexual relationship with the opposite sex without the holy sacrament of marriage as most of us know is a sin. Unfortunately our generation should've applied Beyonce's song in our lives "if you like it then you should’ a put a ring on it". Studies indicate that more than three-quarters of young people have had sexual intercourse by the age of nineteen and continually rising by the year. The billion dollar questions here is why, Why didn't people follow our ancestors and formed the dumb idea to have sex without being married first? What are the causes of premarital sex? Why do people engage in casual sex? What are the advantages and disadvantages of premarital sex? Are there positive effects from engaging in premarital sex?

II. CONTENT
II. A.)

Premarital sex is sexual activity practiced by persons who are unmarried. Historically it has been considered taboo in some cultures and religions. Until the 1950s the term "pre-marital sex" referred to sexual relations between two people prior to marrying each other. During that period, Western societies expected that men and women marry by the age of 21 or 22; as such, there were no considerations that one who had sex would not marry. The term was used instead of fornication, due to the negative connotations of the latter. The meaning has since shifted, referring to all sexual relations a person has prior to marriage; this removes emphasis on who the relations are with. The definition has a degree of ambiguity. It is not clear whether sex between individuals legally forbidden from marrying, or the sexual relations of one uninterested in marrying, could be considered premarital. Alternative terms for pre-marital sex have been suggested, including non-marital sex, youthful sex, adolescent sex, and young-adult sex. These terms also suffer from a degree of ambiguity, as the definition of having sex differs from person to person.

In the English-speaking part of Christendom, sex before marriage became taboo from the implementation of the Hardwicke Marriage Act in 1753. This was in spite of there being "nothing said about premarital sex in the New Testament. The fact that this is not mentioned may seem strange in light of the fact that passages in the New Testament dealing with sexuality in general are quite extensive. Subjects include: the Apostolic Decree, sexual immorality, and divine love, mutual self-giving, bodily membership between Christ and between husband and wife and honor versus dishonor of adultery. Even with the large number of Bible passages that address issues of sexuality, interpretation of these verses can vary. The issue of premarital sex is a good example of how the same verse can be viewed in different ways. In modern English, fornication typically refers to voluntary sexual intercourse between persons not married to each other. Given that modern definition, a verse that condemns fornication which is often cited by conservative denominations as biblical opposition to pre-marital sex would appear to be clear. However, in the New Testament, fornication is the word used to translate the Koine Greek word porneia into English. In Ancient Greek, the word porneia meant "illicit sex" or "illegal sex". Early Christians interpreted this word to encompass activities such as incest and bestiality. Modern-day conservative Christians tend to prefer the definition of premarital sex, or will even choose to broaden the term to also include activities such as masturbation and pornography, while liberal Christians tend to limit the interpretation of...
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