Monorail Thesis

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  • Topic: Monorail, Light rail, Monorails
  • Pages : 19 (4019 words )
  • Download(s) : 252
  • Published : October 22, 2012
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CONTENTS

* INTRODUCTION
* OBJECTIVE
* SCOPE OF STUDY
* NEED OF STUDY
* METHEDOLOGY
* LITERATURE REVIEW
* CASE STUDY
* CONCLUSION
* BIBLIOGRAPHY

1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Why Monorail?
Monorails are the cheapest way of adding grade-separated, high-capacity public transport over the gridlock on the ground. They are also totally independent of existing tram, train and bus systems.

1.1.1 Monorails are proven.
Many monorail systems are in use as high-capacity public transport systems carrying thousands of passengers a day – especially in Japan

1.1.2 Monorails are safe.
Being totally grade-separated monorails are one of the safest forms of transport.

1.1.3 Monorails are environmentally friendly.
Monorails have similar energy-efficiency to other mass-transit systems. They are far less energy-intensive to build than a rail subway while having a far lower footprint than surface rail. Monorails can be installed with a minimum of disruption on the ground and have a lower visual impact than other types of elevated rail systems. Monorails can travel at over 80km/h providing an excellent alternative to cars in crowded cities. 1.1.4 Monorails are cost effective.

Retrofitting a subway to a crowded city is usually prohibitively expensive. Great uncertainties usually exist as to the full cost of dealing with the myriad underground services (sewers, storm water, mains water, electricity & gas.) as well as geological challenges such as rock and mud. Often subway systems are below sea-level creating many expensive and time-consuming challenges during construction and maintenance. 1.15 Monorails are quick to build.

The monorails proposed here could be built in time for the 2014 election. Monorails Cost Less Monorail systems cost about 5 to 10% per kilometre of a subway system. Construction risks are less with Monorail system due to the ease of above-ground construction.

* It is one of the urban rapid transit system.
* Mono rail is a rail-based transportation system based on a single rail. * In this vehicle bodies are connected to the beam allowing curves to be negotiated. * Faster transportation.
* Cheaper as compared to metro.

Disabled Access
The Monorail system can be accessed by lift from street level. As lift floor, platform floor and monorail car floors are at the same level there is no impediment to the disabled person using a Monorail system. Hitachi's vehicles are also able to accept a walkway to evacuate disabled passengers between monorail trains should a monorail become stranded between stations. Operation

Ideally the Monorail would use the new myki system. It could be operated by Metro, Yarra Trams or some other body. Hitachi monorail trains can be fully or partially automated. If partially automated an operator would close the doors and then the train's computer would drive the monorail to the next station as is done for London's Dockland Light Rail. Stations

Stations can be built into existing buildings increasing the value of the building. Minor stations could have a smaller footprint if they use multiple lifts rather than escalators. Stairs should also be provided for the athletic as well as for emergencies. Ideally stations would be translucent to reduce visual impact. This would entail as much as possible of the structure being constructed of glass or other transparent material. Solar panels could provide power to the station. Station walls would probably need to wrap around the monorail to provide protection for passengers in bad weather.

Aesthetics
Melbourne’s monorail could be a great visual asset to the city and a major tourist draw card if adequate attention is given to the design of the pillars and beamway. (This has not always been the case with other existing monorails.) A ‘Medium sized’ monorail such as the Seattle Monorail is recommended for Melbourne. The ‘large sized’ monorail such as the...
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