Module in Conjunctions

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  • Topic: Grammatical conjunction, Dependent clause, Clause
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Module
In
Introduction to Linguistic
(CONJUNCTIONS)

Submitted by
Joana Jane D. Santos
Year and Section
BSEDE-3-1
Conjunctions
Are…..Submitted to
Ronald Allan Casido

What is Conjunction?
* A Conjunction is a word or phrases that connect other words or group of words. * Conjunction is like glue. It helps things to stick together.

Example:
I went to the market to buy milk, eggs and bread.

* Conjunctions connect two prepositional phrases
Example:
I went skiing down the hill and past the trees.

* Conjunction can connect two sentences or clauses.
* When two sentences are joined, a comma MUST be placed before the conjunction. Example:
I played cards for awhile but then I played chess.

Types of Conjuctions
1. Coordinating Conjunctions
2. Subordinating Conjunctions
3. Correlative Conjunctions

1. Coordinating Conjunctions

* They connect words, phrases, and clauses, which are sentences. * They connect things of equal value.
(This means that they would connect a noun with another noun or a prepositional phrase with another prepositional phrase.)

* There are seven coordinating conjunctions:
for
or
but
and

so
yet
nor

* Coordinating Conjunction affects the meaning of your sentence.

Popcorn Pizza

* “And” connects things that are alike or joined together.
Example:
I want popcorn and pizza.

* But” is used to connect things that are different or separated.
Example:
I want popcorn but not pizza.

* “Or” is used to offer a choice.
Example:
Do I want popcorn or pizza?

* “Nor” is used to offer a negative choice.
Example:
I do not want popcorn nor pizza.

* “Yet” is used to show a change. When it is used to combine two sentences, you must put a comma before it.
Example:
I want popcorn, yet I also want pizza.

* “So” is used to show a relationship between things. When it is used to combine two sentences, you must put a comma before it.
Example:
I want popcorn, so I made some.

* “For” is also used to show a relationship between things. When it is used to combine two sentences, you must put a comma before it.
Example:
I ordered a pizza, for I was hungry.

2. Subordinating Conjunctions

* Subordinating Conjunctions introduces a dependent clause and indicates the nature of the relationship among the independent clause(s) and the dependent clause(s). * Connects things which are not equal. One is less important than the other. * The subordinating conjunction must come first before the dependent idea in a sentence.

after| as| although| because| before| How| If| Once| Since| Than| That| Though| Till| Until| When| Whether| while| |

Example:

* When the dependent idea comes first, it must be separated from the main idea with comma.

Example:
* Since you didn’t play, we lost the game.
Subordinating conjunction: Since
Dependent idea: you didn’t play
Main: we lost the game
(note the comma)

* Troy studied hard so that he could get good grades.
Sub:
Dependent idea: he could get good grades
Main: Troy studied hard
(note the lack of a comma)

* After she had learned to drive, Alice felt more independent. * If  the paperwork arrives on time, your cheque will be mailed on Tuesday. * Gerald had to begin his thesis over again when his computer crashed.

Midwifery advocates argue that home births are safer because he mother and baby are exposed to fewer people and fewer germs.

3. Correlative Conjunction
* Another type of conjunction is called correlative conjunctions. * Correlative conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses, which are sentences. * Correlative conjunctions connect things of equal...
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